News Room

The latest news from BUIRA

Work and Equalities Institute, The University of Manchester Seminar series January to May 2019

Work and Equalities Institute, The University of Manchester

Seminar series January to May 2019

 

Dr Emily Yarrow, University of Edinburgh Business School

An unequal opportunity? Female academics’ experiences of research evaluation in the UK'

Date:              Wednesday 16th January 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue:          Alliance Manchester Business School East B7

 

 

Dr Edward Yates, Sheffield University Management School

Young workers and local economic development strategies in Greater Manchester

Date:              Wednesday 6th February 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue:          Alliance Manchester Business School 3.008

 

 

Dr Jean Jenkins, Cardiff Business School

Title to be confirmed

Date:              Wednesday 13th March 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue:          Alliance Manchester Business School 3.008

 

 

Prof Irena Grugulis, Leeds University Business School

Title to be confirmed

Date:              Wednesday 8th May 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School 3.008

11th December 2018

The School of Management at Swansea University are recruiting

he School of Management at Swansea University are recruiting in the area of People and Organisations:

 

Lecturer in People & Organisations: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/personnel/jobs/details.php?nPostingID=29518&nPostingTargetID=44292&option=52&sort=DESC&respnr=1&ID=QHUFK026203F3VBQB7VLO8NXD&LOV4=7813&LOV5=9450&JOBADLG=UK&Resultsperpage=20&lg=UK&mask=suext

 

Senior Lecturer in People & Organisations: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/personnel/jobs/details.php?nPostingID=29538&nPostingTargetID=44313&option=52&sort=DESC&respnr=1&ID=QHUFK026203F3VBQB7VLO8NXD&LOV4=7813&LOV5=9450&JOBADLG=UK&Resultsperpage=20&lg=UK&mask=suext  

 

For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Geraint Harvey (g.harvey@swansea.ac.uk).

11th December 2018

Doctoral program in Human Resources and Labor Relations at Michigan State University (USA

We are currently accepting applicants for our doctoral program in Human Resources and Labor Relations at Michigan State University (USA). We are looking for bright applicants who have an interest in examining issues involving work. Our program offers five years of funding, a tuition waiver, and health insurance. Unique attributes of our program include the ability of students to explore issues related to work from multiple points of view (e.g. employer, employee, union) and the opportunity for our students to take courses not only in our School of Human Resources and Labor Relations but also in other top programs across the MSU campus, such as those in the Management department or in Organizational Psychology. Our small size guarantees that each student will receive individualized attention and support.
 
If you are interested or have any students who may be interested in learning more about this program, please contact our doctoral program coordinator, Dr. Angela Hall ( athall@msu.edu), or go to the below website.
https://hrlr.msu.edu/prospective/doctoral/index.php#.W--xLfZRdPY 

11th December 2018

The Emerging Industrial Relations of China’, edited by William Brown and Chang Kai

The Emerging Industrial Relations of China’, edited by William Brown
and Chang Kai, published by Cambridge University Press, is now available
in paperback at £22.99.
Described as a ‘first-rate volume’ by Bruce Kaufman in Relations
Industrielles/Industrial Relations: ‘The major paradox they draw
attention to is that China and its government leaders have opted for a
policy of greater collective organization of industrial relations in
reaction to intensified market pressures and worker dissatisfaction,
while most other nations of the world have gone in the opposite
direction of deregulation and individualization of employment relations.’

11th December 2018

ILERA 12th European Congress 2019

In September 2019 the International Labor and Employment Relations Association (ILERA) will hold its 12th European Congress in Düsseldorf, Germany. The theme of the congress will be “Perspectives of Employment Relations in Europe” and thematic tracks will focus on issues such as equality & poverty, the regulation of labor, industrial democracy & workers’ voice as well as the quality of work & digitalization. The congress website and call for paper can be accessed at www.ilera2019.eu .

11th December 2018

BUIRA Conference 2019 Uncertain Futures/Fractured Worlds

BUIRA Conference 2019

Uncertain Futures/Fractured Worlds:

The future of employment regulation and rights after Brexit.

 

Newcastle University Business School, 1-3 July 2019

 

Call for papers now open

As the withdrawal of the UK from the European Union occurs only months prior to our conference next year, a major question we need to discuss will be around the uncertain future of employment legislation and regulation post Brexit. 

A substantial amount of UK employment legislation is grounded in EU law.  Does this mean that the withdrawal from the EU will mean UK employment rights currently guaranteed by EU law would no longer be so guaranteed?  Theresa May had confirmed that workers’ existing legal rights will be guaranteed during her period in office – but her position has looked untenable for some time now, even more so recently.  A post-Brexit government could seek to amend or remove any of these.  Of course, what would be amended or removed is a much more open question, since it is affected by the political ideology of a future Government. We are fully aware of previous Conservative administrations’ long-standing opposition to many EU social rights.

 

What then, could be the effect on individuals who rely directly on EU law (i.e. the right to equal pay, agency workers, working time rights)?

 

Empirical (both quantitative and qualitative), analytical, conceptual and methodological papers are all welcome. We would particularly appreciate submissions from early career researchers and doctoral students. Papers concerning topics under the following headings will be particularly welcome:

 

  • Migrant workers from the EU and their position
  • Challenges for Trade Unions
  • Implications for Equality and Diversity
  • The EU and the (future of the) Social Dimension

 

Submission details

 

Abstracts of papers should be submitted via https://www.buira.org/admin/submissions/create

 

Deadline for submission of abstracts: Monday, 14th January 2019.

Abstracts are refereed anonymously by BUIRA Executive Committee members.

23rd November 2018

BUIRA 2019 Stream/ Panel Event – Progressive Employers and Positive Employment Relations.

BUIRA 2019 Stream/ Panel Event – Progressive Employers and Positive Employment Relations – Newcastle – 1-3 July 2019.

Current trends in radical and pluralist industrial relations tend to emphasise employee organizing from below and trade unions as independent social movements, on the one hand; or state regulation from above, on the other (see Heery 2016). In the latter spirit, the 2017 Labour Party manifesto promised to 'roll out sectoral collective bargaining'. The missing link is these narratives is the progressive employer, or what Hyman (2015) has termed, 'good capitalism'. Even the large Partnership literature (see Johnstone 2015), has tended to focus on trade union behaviour.

Organized workers need stable employer recognition for unions to thrive (Simms 2013), something it's almost impossible for the state to impose without substantial employer support. As Ackers (2015) argues, trade union legitimacy power rests on a diamond of stakeholders: employees, the state (political parties), public opinion and employers. Arguably, the last play an important role in shaping the others. More widely, good working conditions and policies to counter the spread of cut-price employment policies like zero-hour contracts, depend on labour market leadership by progressive employers, unionised and non-union.

Progressive employers, such Lever and Cadbury, played a central role in the C20th rise of joint regulations (Clegg et al 1964, Clegg 1985, 1994). British 'Paternalists' not only championed good stable working conditions and employee welfare, but as 'sophisticated moderns' (Fox 1974) promoted and spread trade unions and pluralist IR among the 'standard modern' mainstream. Public employers also spread good employment practice.

This stream/ panel (depending on numbers) invites papers on any aspect of the progressive employer, past, present or future. We are particularly interested in examples of active agency in Developing Positive Employment Relations ((Johnstone & Wilkinson 2016), which challenge the current picture of employers as passive receivers of employment rules. Any employer that promotes good employee working conditions will qualify!

Peter Ackers & Stewart Johnstone

The organisers are happy to discuss ideas for potential submissions peter.ackers1@virginmedia.com; stewart.johnstone@ncl.ac.uk

23rd November 2018

Is whistleblowing the new normal?

HE UNIVERSITY OF GREENWICH WORK AND EMPLOYMENT RESEARCH UNIT /
CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON EMPLOYMENT AND WORK
 
 Is whistleblowing the new normal?
 
Wednesday 12th December 2018
TIME: 15.00 – 18.00
 
VENUE:  Room HH102, Hamilton House, Park Vista, Greenwich SE10 9LZ
 
In the context of whistleblowing, policy-makers have recently started to shift the focus from the person of the whistleblower towards the recipients of whistleblowing, i.e. those whom whistleblowers call upon to stop wrongdoing. Increasingly, organisations are implementing speak-up policies through procedures, training, and in-house or outsourced hotlines. Is this a new form of managerialism? Is it, as some voice scholars wrote recently (Barry & Wilkinson, 2016 BJIR), "pro-social or pro-management"? On the other hand, research shows that external whistleblowing is most often a result of badly managed internal whistleblowing. Hence, the way organisations institutionalise whistleblowing warrants our attention. This seminar discusses the institutionalisation of whistleblowing, around four pieces of recent research.

 

Dr Erik Mygind du Plessis, Copenhagen Business School.
"Speaking truth through power: Conceptualizing internal hotlines using Foucault's dispositive."

 

Prof David Lewis, Middlesex University.
"What information about whistleblowing do the FTSE top 100 firms post on their website?"

 

Dr Mahaut Fanchini, University of Paris-Dauphine.
“The co-construction of whistleblowing: How expectations of the recipient frame ‘acceptable’ whistleblowing narratives."

 

Arron Phillips, University of Greenwich.
"Do trade union members blow the whistle differently? Exploring data from a UK whistleblower advice line."

 
Chaired by Dr Wim Vandekerckhove, University of Greenwich


Speakers:
 
Erik Du Plessis is assistant Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy at Copenhagen Business School. His research explores ways in which whistleblowing is institutionalised. Previous studies include whistleblowing in the context of Danish trade unions.

David Lewis is Professor of Employment Law at Middlesex University. He is the convenor of the International Whistleblowing Research Network. He is head of the Whistleblowing Research Unit at Middlesex University, and has published widely on the topic of whistleblowing since the mid-1990s.

Mahaut Francini is Assistant Professor in Organisation Studies at the University of Paris-Dauphine. Her research focuses on understanding practices and discourses related to the reception of whistleblowing episodes.

Arron Phillips is a WERU/CREW PhD student at the University of Greenwich. His current research focuses on the role of trade unions in the whistleblowing process.

Wim Vandekerckhove is Reader in Business Ethics at the University of Greenwich, and WERU/CREW member. He has provided expertise on whistleblowing to various stakeholders, including Council of Europe, Transparency International, ACCA, British Standards Institute, Financial Conduct Authority, Department of Health, and Public Concern at Work. He is currently the convenor of the ISO working group (TC309/WG3) developing an international standard on internal whistleblowing systems.
 
This is a free seminar, open to the public and all are invited, but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by registering your interest at:   Business School Events with your name, job title and organisation to attend. Or email Dr Ruth Ballardie on R.T.Ballardie@greenwich.ac.uk


HOW TO FIND US:
Hamilton House, 15 Park Vista, Greenwich, London SE10 9LZ
Telephone: +44 20 8331 9083 E-mail: i3centre@gre.ac.uk

21st November 2018

2018 CIPD Applied Research Conference

Dear colleague,

We still have places available for the 2018 CIPD Applied Research Conference taking place at Nottingham Business School on 5-6 December.

 

Improving the world of work rests on quality research feeding into employment policy and practice. Now in its 4th year, the Applied Research Conference exists for this purpose, strengthening links between research and practice. Come and be a part of it!

 

Information on the programme, bookings and previous years’ conferences is available at www.cipd.co.uk/arc

 

I hope to see you there. Please share this email with any colleagues you think may be interested.

21st November 2018

Massey University, NZ - vacancy for Head of School

Massey University, NZ - vacancy for Head of School

 

Massey Business School is one of New Zealand’s (NZ) leading and largest business schools, and is ranked in the top 2% business schools globally. The School of Management is a large academic unit based at Auckland and Palmerston North, with particular strengths in Human Resource Management and Employment Relations.

 

The Head of School of Management will provide effective academic leadership and management, within the strategic framework of Massey Business School and wider University. You will be a dynamic, innovative and effective academic leader, who possesses a clear and compelling vision to shape the future direction, academic development and research achievements of the School. Proven management and financial planning skills, along with superior human resource management abilities, are also essential for this role. This role will offer you an outstanding opportunity to further develop a well-established and internationally recognised School, with the flexibility to be based in either the Auckland campus in Albany, or the Manawatu campus in Palmerston North.

 

Appointment will be on a permanent (tenured) basis, with the role as Head of School being an initial term of five years, after which time a further term may be available. Preference is for candidates appointable at Professorial level, although Associate Professor may be considered for the right candidate.

 

Applications close on 13 January 2019.

 

Details available at http://massey-careers.massey.ac.nz/10588/head-of-school-of-management

 

Further enquiries should be directed to: Professor Stephen Kelly Pro Vice-Chancellor, Massey Business SchoolS.J.Kelly@massey.ac.nz

21st November 2018

Work and well-being in the 21st century

The Regulating for Decent Work Organizing Committee is delighted to announce the Call for Abstracts for its 2019 RDW Conference.

 

The Conference is on the theme  Work and well-being in the 21st century and will be held at the International Labour Office, Geneva, Switzerland from 8–10 July 2019. The conference is organised around four tracks:

 

·         Transitions and transformations in the world of work

·         Rethinking capitalism

·         Well-being in the world of work

·         Building and renewing institutions: a social contract for the 21st century

 

As you may know the Conference is organized by the International Labour Office (ILO) in collaboration with:

  • Amsterdam Institute for Labour Studies / Hugo Sinzheimer Instituut (AIAS-HSI) University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Centre for Employment and Labour Relations Law (CELRL) University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Centre for Informal Sector and Labor Studies (CISLS)  Jawaharlal Nehru University, India
  • Durham Law School (DLS) University of Durham, UK
  • Institut für Arbeit und Qualifikation (IAQ) University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
  • Institute for Applied Economic Research (IPEA) Brasilia, Brazil
  • Korea Labor Institute (KLI) Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Work and Equalities Institute (WEI) University of Manchester, UK

Please circulate the Call for Abstracts, among your colleagues and networks. The link for submissions of abstracts and other details can be found at the conference website at: http://www.ilo.org/rdw2019.

20th November 2018

David Winchester

David Winchester 

Sadly David Winchester - BUIRA member who taught at the LSE (1970-78) and then Warwick (1978-2001) - died on October 23. His funeral will be on Friday November 16 and in the afternoon (from 1 p.m.) friends, family and colleagues are getting together to celebrate his life. This will be at The Orangery, Goldney Hall, University of Bristol, Lower Clifton Hill, Bristol BS8 1BH. 

Please email stephanietailby@gmail.com for further detail. 

2nd November 2018

Applications are invited for a fixed-term temporary Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies.

Applications are invited for a fixed-term temporary Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies.

Vacancy HUM-12990/Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies[Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies], 

https://www.jobs.manchester.ac.uk/displayjob.aspx?jobid=16343

The closing date is 15/11/2018.

2nd November 2018

Call for papers and special issue expressions of interest

Call for papers and special issue expressions of interest

Labour and Industry: A journal of the social and economic relations of work is published by Taylor and Francis and is the official journal of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ). The journal was recently ranked ‘2’ by the UK Chartered Association of Business Schools (CABS) and retained its ‘B’ in the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) list.

The journal is increasingly international and multi-disciplinary in focus. We welcome high-quality submissions that develop understanding of employment relations, human resource management and the sociology of work. We are also keen to receive proposals for special issues. For further information please consult our website (https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rlab20/current) or contact our editorial team:  Professor Jim Arrowsmith (j.arrowsmith@massey.ac.nz); Dr Noelle Donnelly (Noelle.Donnelly@vuw.ac.nz); or Professor Jane Parker (j.parker@massey.ac.nz).

2nd November 2018

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

 

The German Revolution 1918: Industrial Relations and Social Change

Wednesday 7 November 2018: 15.30-17.30 (tea/coffee from 15.00)

Room C379, University of Westminster Business School, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)


For further details or to reserve a place, please e-mail

Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk).

Programme:


3.00-3.20pm: Tea/ coffee/ refreshments

3.20pm: Welcome and introductions: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

 

3.30-4.00pm: Ralf Hoffrogge

Shop Stewards and Revolution: From Workers´ Councils to Works Councils (1916-1920)

In German industrial relations, works councils, established in 1920 and re-introduced into West German labour law in 1952, guarantee representation of employees independently of trade-union membership or recognition. This long standing institution of German corporatism evolved out of the council movement during the Revolution 1918/1919. Usually, the councils are identified with icons such as Rosa Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, but their specific origins lay in the mass strikes organized by rebellious shop stewards since 1916. This presentation outlines the history of the so-called Revolutionary Shop Stewards, a network organizing anti-war mass strikes between 1916 and 1918 and a backbone of the council movement during the German Revolution of 1918-1919. Over this period, the Revolutionary Shop Stewards managed to become a synthesis of an avant-garde group and grassroots organization, pushing the masses forward but never failing to maintain a mode of democratic representation. However, the presentation also traces its dissolution, which started in 1919.

 

4.00-4.30pm: James Muldoon

Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Kautsky on the Prospects for a Socialist Democracy

The emergence of workers' and soldiers' councils across Germany during 1918 brought an end to the reign of the Kaiser and opened the possibility of radical social and political transformation. With conservative and reactionary groups temporarily obstructed and overwhelmed, the Executive Council of the Workers’ and Soldiers’ Councils declared itself the highest political authority of the Socialist Republic of Germany and ordered that the councils’ power ‘must be secured and expanded so that the achievements of the revolution will benefit the entire working class’. Various political theorists and actors within the council movement developed different, sometimes competing, conceptions of how Germany could be transformed into a socialist or workers' democracy. This paper analyses two visions for the future of German politics and contrasts the different strategies, institutions and goals of revolutionary struggle in the political writings of Karl Kautsky and Rosa Luxemburg in order to shed new light on what is at stake for contemporary politics.

 

4.30-5.00pm: General discussion

5.00pm: Close (followed by drinks until 5.30pm)
 

The speakers:

James Muldoon is a lecturer in political science at the University of Exeter. He is editor of Council Democracy: Towards a Democratic Socialist Politics; Trumping the Mainstream: the Conquest of Mainstream Democratic Politics by the Populist Right; and the forthcoming The German Revolution and Political Theory. He is also the author of Hegel’s Philosophy of Drives.

 

Ralf Hoffrogge is postdoctoral researcher at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany) and has published widely on German labour history. His special interest is in biographies, German-Jewish relations within the Labour movement and German Communism during the Weimar Republic. He is currently working on a historical comparison of the German metalworkers’ union Industriegewerkschaft Metall and the British Amalgamated Engineering Union (AEU).

 

2nd November 2018

Vale Dr Sandra Cockfield, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Vale Dr Sandra Cockfield, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia


It is with great sadness that we share the news that our Australian industrial relations colleague, Dr Sandra Cockfield, passed away peacefully on 21 October 2018. She had attended more than one BUIRA conference. If you knew her and will be in Melbourne on 9 Nov. 2018, you might consider attending a Celebration of the Life of Sandra. If you wish to do so, please RSVP at:   

www.eventbrite.com.au/e/celebration-of-the-life-of-dr-sandra-cockfield-registration-51863861205     RSVP only if you wish to attend. Thanks.

 

Sandra was an exceptional woman – witty, generous and caring, she leaves us much too young following a battle with cancer. She had an extensive knowledge of politics, and was passionate about justice and fairness in her personal and academic life. She leaves behind her a life full of achievements and legacies and will be greatly missed by family, friends, colleagues and students.
Sandra’s higher education was at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. She was subsequently a valuable and well-read Senior Lecturer at Monash University, Melbourne. Sandra was a dedicated teacher who specialised in the areas of industrial relations and negotiations. Sandra was highly regarded, especially across the Australian industrial relations community. She was an approachable teacher and friend who saw the positive in people and was inclusive of others. 
Her research on industrial relations had a particular focus on union organisation and strategy, and her thinking was influential in Australia and internationally. Her contributions to the field of research and student learning relating to these topics is substantial and significant. Sandra had a passion for understanding and contributing to sustainability and had also researched and published on sustainable small-scale farming in India. 
Sandra was committed to providing service to governments and other organisations. The National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU) awarded Sandra Life Membership, a rare honour, which recognised her great service to workplace relations at Monash University and beyond. This included being on the NTEU Enterprise Bargaining Team at Monash for twelve years. 
Sandra built a valuable professional reputation and was a co-organiser of activities, for example, with two of her Australian professional societies, the Industrial Relations Society, and the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand. She also contributed as Co-Director, Australian Consortium for Research in Employment and Work, Monash University.

Her contribution to all these organisations will be greatly missed and will remain her legacy long into the future. Sandra was a dear friend to many. Times shared with Sandra talking politics and current affairs were very special. All those who knew her are deeply saddened by her passing, but take comfort and will find joy in the memories of great times shared together. Sandra was an avid traveller. We are very sad to lose her and extend our sincerest condolences to her family.


Instead of sending flowers, a fund will be established to facilitate a lasting tribute to Sandra. For more details, please ask the undersigned. Thanks again.

 

Greg Bamber, Professor, Monash University, in consultation Sandra’s family and close friends: gregbamber@gmail.com

1st November 2018

Call for Papers Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO) Strategic Interest Group European Academy of Management, June 26-28, 2019, Lisbon, Portugal

Call for Papers
Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO) Strategic Interest Group
European Academy of Management, June 26-28, 2019, Lisbon, Portugal

Submission Deadline: January 15, 2019

GRDO SIG Chairwoman: Beverly Metcalf
GRDO SIG Program Chair: Hamid Kazeroony, hamid.kazeroony2@mail.waldenu.edu 

For detail submission requirements please see SIG 05: Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO)

 

T05_02 - Disability equality, fact or fiction? Future directions for workplace integration.

Globally equality legislation has promoted the rights of persons with disabilities (PWD), however, these rights remain elusive in practice. PWD are the largest underutilised labour market group and face distinct disadvantage entering and inside the labour market. Where organisations promote equality and diversity through management practices, there remains a policy to practice implementation gap and weak legislative enforcement of rights. This stream will address the ableist environment which poses challenges to disability inclusion. It will consider key debates on legislative impact, workplace integration for PWD, policy implementation gaps and specific challenges and enablers in the workplace.

 Laura William, University of Greenwich, L.C.William@Greenwich.ac.uk​​

 

29th October 2018

Is whistleblowing the new normal?

Is whistleblowing the new normal?

 

Wednesday 12th December 2018

TIME: 15.00 – 18.00

VENUE:  Room HH102, Hamilton House, Park Vista, Greenwich    SE10 9LZ

 

In the context of whistleblowing, policy-makers have recently started to shift the focus from the person of the whistleblower towards the recipients of whistleblowing, i.e. those whom whistleblowers call upon to stop wrongdoing. Increasingly, organisations are implementing speak-up policies through procedures, training, and in-house or outsourced hotlines. Is this a new form of managerialism? Is it, as some voice scholars wrote recently (Barry & Wilkinson, 2016 BJIR), "pro-social or pro-management"? On the other hand, research shows that external whistleblowing is most often a result of badly managed internal whistleblowing. Hence, the way organisations institutionalise whistleblowing warrants our attention. This seminar discusses the institutionalisation of whistleblowing, around four pieces of recent research.

 

Dr Erik Mygind du Plessis, Copenhagen Business School.

"Speaking truth through power: Conceptualizing internal hotlines using Foucault's dispositive."

 

Prof David Lewis, Middlesex University.

"What information about whistleblowing do the FTSE top 100 firms post on their website?"

 

Dr Mahaut Fanchini, University of Paris-Dauphine.

“The co-construction of whistleblowing: How expectations of the recipient frame ‘acceptable’ whistleblowing narratives."

 

Arron Phillips, University of Greenwich.

"Do trade union members blow the whistle differently? Exploring data from a UK whistleblower advice line."

 

Chaired by Dr Wim Vandekerckhove, University of Greenwich

 

Bios:

Erik Du Plessis is assistant Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy at Copenhagen Business School. His research explores ways in which whistleblowing is institutionalised. Previous studies include whistleblowing in the context of Danish trade unions.

 

David Lewis is Professor of Employment Law at Middlesex University. He is the convenor of the International Whistleblowing Research Network. He is head of the Whistleblowing Research Unit at Middlesex University, and has published widely on the topic of whistleblowing since the mid-1990s.

 

Mahaut Francini is Assistant Professor in Organisation Studies at the University of Paris-Dauphine. Her research focuses on understanding practices and discourses related to the reception of whistleblowing episodes.

 

Arron Phillips is a WERU/CREW PhD student at the University of Greenwich. His current research focuses on the role of trade unions in the whistleblowing process.

 

Wim Vandekerckhove is Reader in Business Ethics at the University of Greenwich, and WERU/CREW member. He has provided expertise on whistleblowing to various stakeholders, including Council of Europe, Transparency International, ACCA, British Standards Institute, Financial Conduct Authority, Department of Health, and Public Concern at Work. He is currently the convenor of the ISO working group (TC309/WG3) developing an international standard on internal whistleblowing systems.

 

This is a free seminar, open to the public and all are invited, but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by registering your interest at:   Business School Events with your name, job title and organisation to attend. Or email Dr Ruth Ballardie on R.T.Ballardie@greenwich.ac.uk

 

25th October 2018

Special issue call for papers from the journal Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

Special issue call for papers from the journal Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

DIVERSITY IN THE WORK-LIFE INTERFACE

For this special issue, the editors are interested in papers presenting research that takes intersecting strands of diversity in exploring the work-life experiences of minority, marginalized, and/or under-researched groups of workers. These may include transgender individuals, other members of the LGBT community, ethnic or religious minority employees, workers with disabilities, low income workers, and men. Other under-researched groups include workers in non-Western contexts, and those with nontraditional family formations. We encourage new insights, new possibilities, and new reflections, inspired by interdisciplinary approaches. Both empirical and theoretical approaches focused on diverse cultural and international settings are welcome.

Guest editors:

T. Alexandra Beauregard, Birkbeck, University of London – 
a.beauregard@bbk.ac.uk
Maria Adamson, Middlesex University Business School – 
m.adamson@mdx.ac.uk 
Aylin Kunter, Middlesex University Business School – 
a.kunter@mdx.ac.uk 
Lilian Miles, Middlesex University Business School – 
l.miles@mdx.ac.uk 
Ian Roper, Middlesex University Business School – 
i.roper@mdx.ac.uk 

Deadline for submissions: February 1, 2019

Please do not submit until January 1, 2019

For more info please go to EDI journal http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/call_for_papers.htm?id=7863

22nd October 2018

Academy of Social Sciences (AcSS): Nominations for Fellowships



BUIRA has recently become a member organization of the Academy of Social Sciences (AcSS), the body that exists in the UK to promote the social sciences.

As part of its membership, BUIRA is now able to make nominations for the conferment of Fellowships of the Academy.

The BUIRA Executive would therefore like to invite BUIRA members to nominate individuals who might be put forward for this honour.  Not only would this recognise the contribution of the individuals concerned, it would raise the profile of employment relations in the broader social science arena.

More on AcSS can be found at: https://www.acss.org.uk/

And details of the nomination process are at:

https://www.acss.org.uk/membership/making-nomination-fellow/

You will see from this that the 'paramount requirement' of a successful nomination is 'evidence of eminence and impact of the nominee’s contribution to social science'.  Formally, this requires a statement of justification and a brief CV.

Could any nominations be sent to BUIRA (admin@buira.org) by NOVEMBER 16 2018.    This will allow the Executive to meet AcSS's next deadline of 30 November.

If you have any queries about the process, please contact the BUIRA Treasurer, Stephen Procter (stephen.procter@newcastle.ac.uk)

22nd October 2018

Feminist Library Appeal

Feminist Library Appeal

 

Colleagues may be aware of the London Feminist Library’s recent struggles – there is some news and an appeal below. The Library is a vital resource for anyone interested in the history and present of women’s experience of work, employment and economic life.

 

The Feminist Library has finally found a new home - but we now need your support more than ever. We urgently need to raise at least £30,000 to be able to fund our move to the new space, and we need to leave our current premises in Spring 2019.

 

After our long struggle against eviction (read more about our struggle to save the Library here.), the move is actually quite unexpectedly exciting! We’ll have a new, (much needed!) bigger space, based within a community centre in Peckham, and named after a woman abolitionist and feminist - Sojourner Truth! The bigger space will allow us to expand our collections and run even more and bigger exciting community events.

 

Yet we have no choice but to leave our current premises with little notice and next to no funds, and need to fundraise for the new space urgently - we need to raise at least £30,000 in order for us to be able to move.

 

Please help us protect this vital community resource! Help save the Feminist Library! Donate to our crowdfunding campaign and read more about it here:

 

www.crowdfunder.co.uk/help-the-feminist-library-build-its-new-home/  

16th October 2018

Fair Work Commission Wales

 

Fair Work Commission Wales

 

The Welsh Government has set up an independent Fair Work Commission to make recommendations to promote and encourage fair work in Wales.

 

A five week call for evidence opens on 12 October.  The research of many BUIRA members will be of relevance to the work of the Commission and they are encouraged to submit evidence via the Fair Work Commission website  http://beta.gov.wales/fair-work-commission

 

The Commission comprises a small independent panel of experts appointed by the First Minister in July 2018. It is chaired by Professor Linda Dickens.  The other Commissioners are: Sharanne Basham-Pyke, Professor Edmund Heery and Sarah Veale.  Professor Alan Felstead is independent expert adviser to the Commission.

 

The Terms of Reference of the Commission are:

 

“On the basis of evidence and analysis the Commission is to make recommendations to promote and encourage fair work in Wales.  

The Commission will develop indicators and measures of fair work and Identify data sources to help monitor progress. It will consider whether measures to promote fair work currently available to the Welsh government could be taken further and identify what new or additional steps might be taken, including new legislation, and make recommendations.”

 

The Commission is to report by March 2019.

 

The call for evidence is aimed at organisations and individuals across the public, private and third sectors.  The Fair Work Commission wishes to tap into a wide range of experience, views and research relevant to its terms of reference.  It is not a consultation on developed proposals but rather an early stage request for input to help the Commission formulate its proposals and shape the recommendations it will make to ministers.   

 

The Commission is holding a number of engagement meetings and is planning to convene an academic workshop in mid January 2019.

 

Professor Linda Dickens                                                                                

Chair, Wales Fair Work Commission

Email. fairworkcommission@gov.wales

 

http://beta.gov.wales/fair-work-commission

16th October 2018

Centre for Public Appointments

  Central Arbitration Committee

There is an advert out on the Public Appointments website for new CAC Deputy Chairs. Linda Dickens and Lynette Harris both recently retired from the CAC

https://publicappointments.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/appointment/deputy-chairs/

16th October 2018

Centre for Public Appointments: CAC Deputy Chairs

There is an advert out on the Public Appointments website for new CAC Deputy Chairs. Linda Dickens and Lynette Harris both recently retired from the CAC

https://publicappointments.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/appointment/deputy-chairs/

16th October 2018

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

 

The German Revolution 1918: Industrial Relations and Social Change

Wednesday 7 November 2018: 15.30-17.30 (tea/coffee from 15.00)

Room C379, University of Westminster Business School, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)


For further details or to reserve a place, please e-mail

Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk).

Programme:


3.00-3.20pm: Tea/ coffee/ refreshments

3.20pm: Welcome and introductions: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

 

3.30-4.00pm: Ralf Hoffrogge

Shop Stewards and Revolution: From Workers´ Councils to Works Councils (1916-1920)

In German industrial relations, works councils, established in 1920 and re-introduced into West German labour law in 1952, guarantee representation of employees independently of trade-union membership or recognition. This long standing institution of German corporatism evolved out of the council movement during the Revolution 1918/1919. Usually, the councils are identified with icons such as Rosa Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, but their specific origins lay in the mass strikes organized by rebellious shop stewards since 1916. This presentation outlines the history of the so-called Revolutionary Shop Stewards, a network organizing anti-war mass strikes between 1916 and 1918 and a backbone of the council movement during the German Revolution of 1918-1919. Over this period, the Revolutionary Shop Stewards managed to become a synthesis of an avant-garde group and grassroots organization, pushing the masses forward but never failing to maintain a mode of democratic representation. However, the presentation also traces its dissolution, which started in 1919.

 

4.00-4.30pm: James Muldoon

Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Kautsky on the Prospects for a Socialist Democracy

The emergence of workers' and soldiers' councils across Germany during 1918 brought an end to the reign of the Kaiser and opened the possibility of radical social and political transformation. With conservative and reactionary groups temporarily obstructed and overwhelmed, the Executive Council of the Workers’ and Soldiers’ Councils declared itself the highest political authority of the Socialist Republic of Germany and ordered that the councils’ power ‘must be secured and expanded so that the achievements of the revolution will benefit the entire working class’. Various political theorists and actors within the council movement developed different, sometimes competing, conceptions of how Germany could be transformed into a socialist or workers' democracy. This paper analyses two visions for the future of German politics and contrasts the different strategies, institutions and goals of revolutionary struggle in the political writings of Karl Kautsky and Rosa Luxemburg in order to shed new light on what is at stake for contemporary politics.

 

4.30-5.00pm: General discussion

5.00pm: Close (followed by drinks until 5.30pm)
 

The speakers:

James Muldoon is a lecturer in political science at the University of Exeter. He is editor of Council Democracy: Towards a Democratic Socialist Politics; Trumping the Mainstream: the Conquest of Mainstream Democratic Politics by the Populist Right; and the forthcoming The German Revolution and Political Theory. He is also the author of Hegel’s Philosophy of Drives.

 

Ralf Hoffrogge is postdoctoral researcher at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany) and has published widely on German labour history. His special interest is in biographies, German-Jewish relations within the Labour movement and German Communism during the Weimar Republic. He is currently working on a historical comparison of the German metalworkers’ union Industriegewerkschaft Metall and the British Amalgamated Engineering Union (AEU).

15th October 2018

Call for Papers Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO) Strategic Interest Group European Academy of Management, June 26-28, 2019, Lisbon, Portugal

Call for Papers
Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO) Strategic Interest Group
European Academy of Management, June 26-28, 2019, Lisbon, Portugal

Submission Deadline: January 15, 2019

GRDO SIG Chairwoman: Beverly Metcalf
GRDO SIG Program Chair: Hamid Kazeroony, 
hamid.kazeroony2@mail.waldenu.edu 

For detail submission requirements please see 
SIG 05: Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO)

 

T05_02 - Disability equality, fact or fiction? Future directions for workplace integration.

Globally equality legislation has promoted the rights of persons with disabilities (PWD), however, these rights remain elusive in practice. PWD are the largest underutilised labour market group and face distinct disadvantage entering and inside the labour market. Where organisations promote equality and diversity through management practices, there remains a policy to practice implementation gap and weak legislative enforcement of rights. This stream will address the ableist environment which poses challenges to disability inclusion. It will consider key debates on legislative impact, workplace integration for PWD, policy implementation gaps and specific challenges and enablers in the workplace.

 Laura William, University of Greenwich, L.C.William@Greenwich.ac.uk

3rd October 2018

THE FUTURE OF EMPLOYMENT REGULATION: A MANIFESTO FOR LABOUR LAW?

HE UNIVERSITY OF GREENWICH WORK AND EMPLOYMENT RESEARCH UNIT
 
THE FUTURE OF EMPLOYMENT REGULATION: A MANIFESTO FOR LABOUR LAW?
 
WEDNESDAY  10 OCTOBER 2018. 15.00 – 18.00
 
VENUE: ROOM HH102, HAMILTON HOUSE, PARK VISTA, GREENWICH, SE10 9LZ
 
This seminar will look at the future of collective bargaining and trade union recognition. Over the past 30 years the extent of collective bargaining in the UK has been significantly reduced and, despite union recognition law being passed by the previous Labour Government, union membership has also declined. Since 2010 the impact of the economic recession and Government austerity policies have not improved this situation. In 2016 a group of legal experts put forward a proposal to increase collective bargaining in the private sector by extending sectoral or industry bargaining, underpinned by strong trade union rights. This was published by the Institute of Employment Rights as ‘A Manifesto for Labour Law’. Professor Keith Ewing of Kings College London and Professor Sonia McKay, Visiting Professor at the University of Greenwich, were both co-authors of the report and they will both speak at the seminar. Our other speakers will be Sarah Veale, previously Head of Equality and Employment Rights at the TUC, and Alastair Hatchett, previously head of pay research at IDS (both are Visiting Fellows at the Work and Employment Research Unit). 
 
Professor Keith Ewing is Professor of Public Law at Kings College London. Professor Ewing joined The Dickson Poon School of Law in 1989. Prior to this he was Visiting Professor at the University of Western Australia (1992); at the University of Alberta (1987-88) and at Osgoode Hall Law School (1982). He has also held positions at the University of Edinburgh, 1978-83 and at the University of Cambridge, 1983-1989.
 
Professor Sonia McKay Sonia McKay is a visiting Professor of European Socio-Legal Studies at the University of Greenwich as well as the University of the West of England. She was previously at the Working Lives Research Institute, London Metropolitan University where she headed a number of research projects, mainly focusing on discrimination, migration and collective organisation at both national and EU level. She holds a law degree from Queens University, Belfast and a Ph.D in employment law from Wolfson College, Cambridge. 
 
Dr Sarah Veale was Head of Equality and Employment Rights at the TUC between 2003 and 2015, when she retired. Since then Sarah has been a Commissioner on the Equality and Human Rights Commission, a member of the Regulatory Policy Committee, an Executive Committee member of the Institute for Employment Rights and Vice Chair of the Equality and Diversity Forum. Previously Sarah was a member of the ACAS Council and the Health and Safety Executive Board.
 
Alastair Hatchett has been a visiting fellow at the University of Greenwich since 2013, having retired from his post of head of pay and research at Incomes Data Services in 2012. He has an extensive knowledge of pay systems and pay bargaining after 30 years of research at IDS. He has led a wide range of pay research projects for the Low Pay Commission, the Pay Review Bodies, many different trade unions, the TUC and the CIPD and was a regular speaker at seminars and conferences. His current research is focussed on public sector pay, the future of collective bargaining and the changing structure of the labour market.
 
This is a free seminar open to the public and all are invited but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by registering your interest at:   Business School Events with your name, job title and organisation to attend. Or email Dr Ruth Ballardie on R.T.Ballardie@greenwich.ac.uk

 
HOW TO FIND US

Hamilton House, 15 Park Vista, Greenwich, London SE10 9LZ
Telephone: +44 20 8331 9083 E-mail: i3centre@gre.ac.uk
 ​

1st October 2018

Can the Future of Work become its past?

Interdisciplinary research seminars on WORK, first semester 2019, to mark the 100th

anniversary of the ILO (1919-2019), organised by the Contact Group FNRS– Work and social

emancipation (Belgium)

Can the Future of Work become its past?

Call for papers

Texts should not be longer than 5 pages (2500 words). They can be

written in English or French, working languages of the study days.

The aim of these texts should be to encourage the debate, on the basis

of specific data and observations or of a broader synthesis, and not the present descriptive

literature reviews.

Return abstracts submissions (200-250 words): 15 October 2018

--

Corinne GOBIN

Maître de recherche du FNRS à l'ULB

 

Directrice du GRAID

Institut de Sociologie

44, av. Jeanne

1050 Bruxelles

Tél.: 32-2-6504915

Fax.: 32-2-6503521

1st October 2018

Job vacancy at Monash University

Professor (e.g. HR or OB)

Location: Caulfield campus, Melbourne

Employment Type: Continuing appointment

Remuneration: AUD $181,066 pa Level E (plus 17% employer superannuation)

Monash is full of thinkers and doers who are looking for their next challenge. So, if you’ve forged a rewarding career so far, this role provides the perfect platform to join us. You’ll have access to quality research facilities, infrastructure and teaching spaces to do exciting work, along with opportunities to collaborate internationally. You’ll be part of a university that’s made up of inspirational, challenging thinkers and doers – and continue doing work that makes a lasting impact.

The Monash Business School is one of the largest business education providers in Australia. The Monash Business School is based in Melbourne, which is ranked (by the Economist Intelligence Unit) as one of the world’s most liveable cities. Melbourne is well known for its coffee, restaurants, night-life and is the sporting capital of Australia. Melbourne is proud of its excellent healthcare, education, diverse culture and booming infrastructure; making it a welcoming and exciting place to work and to call home.

The Department of Management is comprised of influential, world-renown academics, mentoring the talent of future managers and leaders.  Our commitment to excellence is proven through our world-class research outputs and contemporary and engaging teaching practices. The Department delivers quality and impactful research that influences industry and communities. We have a vibrant research culture, coupled with a research seminar and visitor program.

The Department is seeking to appoint a Professor who will continue to advance the department’s contribution to teaching and research. While we welcome applications from all disciplines, applications from human resources or organisational behaviour scholars are strongly encouraged. If you would like to be a part of our world-class department and help grow our vibrant and engaging culture, then we welcome your application.

This position is a continuing, full-time position; however, flexible working arrangements may be negotiated.

Your application must address the selection criteria. Please refer to How to apply for a senior academic position:

https://secure.dc2.pageuppeople.com/apply/TransferRichTextFile.ashx?sData=Fwg6i4Eli-CvqEttJIIpKM_TBF8QaWpPuT8Df-ERmNY28Eyv18Tx4AKxAOqPIk4YhLu4jUSpIDw%7e

Enquiries

Professor Véronique Ambrosini, Head of Department of Management, v.ambrosini@monash.edu

[ For an informal discussion, you would be welcome to talk with Professor Greg Bamber, greg.bamber@monash.edu ]

 

Position Description

http://careers.pageuppeople.com/513/cw/en/job/582132/professor-in-management-business-and-economics

Closing Date

Wednesday 17 October 2018

1st October 2018

SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT for AIRAANZ 2019

SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT for AIRAANZ 2019: ''Global Work, Quality Work" 12-14 February 2019 
by 4 October 2018
 
The closing date for submissions for inclusion in the program of the 33rd annual conference of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of  Australia and New Zealand is coming up fast!   
 
The conference theme  Global Work, Quality Work?  invites us to consider the dilemmas arising from growing disparities in the quality of jobs and from fragmentation of employment, especially in the context of the rapidly changing landscape of global capitalism, labour regulation, labour migration and labour movements.
 
Along with contributions that address the conference themes, a wide range of papers are invited, drawing on industrial relations, human resources, sociology of work and labour rights scholarship and from local, regional and global perspectives.  For further information and conference streams visit the Conference ‘Submissions’ page. 
 
Key dates:
  • 4 October 2018:  Extended deadline for abstract submissions (non-refereed presentations) 
  • 7 December 2018:     Early bird registrations close.
See   here for Postgraduate Scholarships and Early Career Researcher Grants
 
For full conference details:  http://www.airaanz.org/

1st October 2018

Walter Citrine and the Changing International Environment, 1920-1945

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

 

TUC: 150th Anniversary

Walter Citrine and the Changing International Environment, 1920-1945

 

Wednesday 17 October 2018

4.00pm for 4.20-6.30pm (Tea/ coffee from 4.00)

Room tbc, University of Westminster Business School, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)

 

For further details or to reserve a place, please email Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk).

 

Programme:

4.00-4.20pm: Tea/ coffee/ refreshments

4.20-4.30: Welcome: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

 

4.30-5.00: Jim Moher

The TUC leadership and the Left after the General Strike  - Citrine/Bevin - Cripps/Beavan

Walter (Lord) Citrine (1887-1983), General Secretary of the TUC in its heyday – from the General Strike to 1946 – has, largely, but undeservedly, been written out of the history of the Labour movement. He is remembered only for his ABC of Chairmanship, while his stewardship of the TUC, central role as President of the International Federation of Trade Unions (1928-1945) and huge influence on Labour Party policy in the 1930s and 1940s, has been downplayed or ignored. Citrine’s side has rarely been examined but can now be seen to have been far more substantial and significant as a contribution to the Labour movement.

 

5.00-5.30: Jonathan Davis

Searching for Truth in Russia: Walter Citrine’s Soviet Visits in the Interwar Years

The TUC General Secretary Walter Citrine went to the Soviet Union in 1925 and 1935. Touring the country to see how socialism was developing in a country that was seen by many as the vanguard of the international socialist movement, he found reasons to be both optimistic and pessimistic about the development of a left-wing alternative to capitalism. Yet Citrine’s visits have not had the attention they deserve. This talk will therefore consider what Citrine saw when he searched ‘for truth’ in Russia, and it will assess how it contributed to Labour’s socialist identity in the interwar years.

 

5.30-6.00: General discussion

6.00: Close (followed by drinks until 6.30)

 

The speakers:

Dr Jim Moher is a former union national official (T&GWU and CWU) and Labour councillor, turned historian. He has published a chapter on Walter Citrine: A Union Pioneer of Industrial Cooperation in Alternatives to State-Socialism in Britain (editors P. Ackers & A. Reid, Palgrave, 2017), as well as other pieces on Citrine. He is working on the first biography of the TUC leader and is a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London.

 

Dr Jonathan Davis is Senior Lecturer in History and Co-director of the Labour History Research Unit at Anglia Ruskin University. He has published widely on Labour and the Soviet Union and is co-editor of Labour and the Wider World (I. B. Tauris, 2008), Britain’s Second Labour Government, 1929-31: a reappraisal (MUP, 2011), and Labour and the Left in the 1980s (MUP, 2018). He is currently writing a global history of the 1980s for Routledge.

1st October 2018

The impact of the Trade Union Act 2016 on strikes and industrial action: Doing what it says on the tin?

The impact of the Trade Union Act 2016 on strikes and industrial action: Doing what it says on the tin? Come along to the next MIRS meeting with speaker Professor Gregor Gall: Visiting Professor of Industrial Relations, Leeds University Business School
Thursday 11 October 2018, 6pm http://www.mirs.org.uk

1st October 2018

Making Good Work: Policy, Practice and Research Workshop Tuesday 30 th October 2018

Making Good Work: Policy, Practice and Research

Workshop Tuesday 30th October 2018

 

Science Gallery, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9GU

Improving the quality of jobs is a widely shared goal among the three communities of: policy makers; practitioners in companies and trade unions; and researchers. There is also widespread consensus that policy, practice and research could be improved if dialogue between these three specialist communities were better.

This workshop seeks to address this situation and improve engagement between the three communities, with specific reference to research, policy and practice around improving the quality of work.

 

In the morning session two presentations will explore the processes involved in

successful collaboration. In the afternoon, workshops jointly facilitated by academics,

policymakers and practitioners will discuss the practicalities of collaborative working.

Academics will be able to engage directly with policymakers and practitioners, as they, in their turn, will be able to engage directly with academics. We hope that this will help to establish an environment where professionals can meet and where all can learn from existing collaborations which produce high quality research that is collaborative and that has impact. This will also be an opportunity to exchange ideas which will lead to future collaborations to tackle bad jobs and improve job quality.

The fee to attend is £80, with lunch and refreshments provided.

PhD students and Early Career Researchers will be charged £30 and there may be

additional support available for them.

Please book online at:

https://store.leeds.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/leeds-university-business-school/research-

events/making-good-work-policy-practice-and-research

AGENDA

9.00

Registration and coffee

10.00

Welcome – Professor Stephen Bach, Dean of King’s Business

School

10.15 – 12.15

Professor Patricia Findlay (Strathclyde University), Grahame Smith

(General Secretary, Scottish TUC) and Linda Murray (Head

of

Strategy Services Scottish Enterprise).

Professor Monder Ram (Aston University) and Fuad Mahamed

(CEO Ashley Integrates).

12.15 – 13.15

Lunch break

13.15 – 14.15

Break out groups Session One

14.15 – 14.45

Coffee break

14.45 – 15.45

Break out groups Session Two

15.45 – 16.15

Debrief, Closing remarks

 

Workshop Organisers: Professor Irena Grugulis (Leeds), Professor Katie Bailey (Kings)and Professor Kevin Daniels (UEA)

 

Workshop Steering Group: Professor Paul Edwards (Birmingham), Dr Diane Burns

(Sheffield), Professor John Childs (Birmingham), Professor Anne-Marie Greene

(Leicester), Professor Ray Loveridge (Oxford), Professor Monder Ram (Aston), Kiran

Trehan (Birmingham), Professor Chris Warhurst (Warwick), Dr M Williams (Surrey)​

24th September 2018

A History & Policy Trade Union and Employment Forum conference

A History & Policy Trade Union and Employment Forum conference

 

Saturday 6th October 2018, 10am -5pm

Lecture Theatre 3, Bush House (North East Wing),

King’s College London, 30 Aldwych, London WC2B 4BG

 

In 1868, while suffering under major legal restrictions, the British

trade unions teamed up to found a central body to lobby for their

wider social and industrial aims and rights. Today, when unions are

again subject to severe legal disadvantage, it is timely to recall the

first Trades Union Congress (TUC) and unions’ achievements, and

to look forward on union prospects for the future.

 

Speakers and chairs including:

  • Sarah Veale, former Head of Equality and Employment Rights at the

TUC

  • Paul Nowak, TUC Deputy General Secretary
  • Nick Jones, journalist and broadcaser, and former BBC industrial

and senior political correspondent

  • Lord John Monks, General Secretary of the TUC 1993-2003
  • Gail Cartmail, Assistant General Secretary, UNITE
  • Laura Cohen, CEO, British Ceramic Confederation
  • Mark Curthoys, research editor, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  • John Edmonds, former General Council chair and GMB, General Secretary
  • Dr James Moher a former union official and historian of the

Labour movement

  • Peter Ackers, Visiting Professor, Loughborough University

 

Places are free but limited so booking is essential. Please

Email historyandpolicy@kcl.ac.uk

to advise of any disability or

access requirements.

 

the Eventbrite listing is up

here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/democracy-

at-work-150-years-of-the-tuc-tickets-49649947329

24th September 2018

The Launch of The Work and Equalities Institute

The Launch of The Work and Equalities Institute
Wednesday 14 November 2018 at
The University of Manchester
Debating the future of work and equalities in the fourth industrial revolution
in the birthplace of the first industrial revolution
Our formal launch will take place at a drinks reception at 6.30pm in
The Fossils Gallery, Manchester
Museum, 14 November 2018.
The launch will conclude an afternoon of three interactive panel debates from 2pm at
University Place, to which you are also invited. These will focus on important themes for contemporary society, building on
and developing Manchester’s rich legacy of contributions to equalities at work.
The first panel will discuss human rights and the responsibilities of business and society to ensure dignity,
fair treatment and fair access to work.
-
The second panel will debate the priorities and possibilities for promoting equalities in the workplace.
-
The final panel debate, to be chaired by University of Manchester governor and distinguished journalist
Michael Crick, will consider the impact of the fourth industrial revolution on work and equalities.
These panels, comprising distinguished and informed speakers, will help to set the agenda for the Work and
Equalities Institute. New ways of working, new risks to equalities and new concerns over the potential loss
of jobs are intensifying debates on how we organise work in the future, what we can do to promote decent
forms of work, and the responsibilities society and the business community have towards citizens and
workers.
To find out more, visit
https://www.mbs.ac.uk/events/the-launch-of-the-work-and-equalities-institute-at-
the-university-of-manchester/
Register for the event here:
https://www.mbs.ac.uk/events/wei-launch/

24th September 2018

BUIRA PhD Network Symposium 2018 Philosophy, Paradigms, and Programmes of enquiry in Management and Work Related Doctoral Research

BUIRA PhD Network Symposium 2018
Philosophy, Paradigms, and Programmes of enquiry in Management and Work Related Doctoral
Research
University of Liverpool, Thursday November 1, to Friday November 2, 2018.
The Symposium this year will be an academic boot camp on Research Methodology, with special focus on
Philosophy, Paradigms, and Programmes of enquiry in Management and Work Related Doctoral Research.
It will be led by Professor Steve Fleetwood, an Emeritus Professor of Human Resource Management and
Employment Relations at
Bristol Business School
in the
University of West of England, UK.
Professor Fleetwood
specialises in all aspects of work and employment; he has written and published books and journal articles on subjects of
philosophy and methodology of social science, especially critical realism, and their application to subjects like labour economics, organisation studies, employment relations and human resource management. At the workshop, his introductory lecture will be based on his
(2014) chapter, `Bhaskar and Critical Realism.
 
In the two day symposium, participants would have opportunity to discuss ontology and paradigm issues in
their doctoral work, and have feedback and comments from Steve and peers.
 
Registration is free please email an abstract of 250-350 words on your research topic and methodology,
please indicate your year of registration, and institution on the abstract (open to both full time and part
time). Send email to: buiraphd@outlook.com
Registration closes on Friday, 12 October 2018
.
Tea and coffee break will be catered for by the organisers, there will be symposium dinner on Thursday
night
- open to all participants
, to meet and network. Participants are to make
additional arrangements
for accommodation, feeding, and transportation. Symposium opens 10;00am of Thursday, and closes 12:noon
of Friday. - room details will be confirmed.
The main train station for Liverpool is
Liverpool Lime Street
(map)
,
National Express
run regular coach
services to Liverpool One Bus Terminal (map),
we encourage delegates to take the short 15 minute walk
from Lime Street to UoL Campus (map).
There are some hotels near the Campus – the
Hallmark
Inn(
map); the
Liner Hotel
(map); the
Hope Street Hotel
(map) the
Britannia Adelphi Hotel
(map);
the Printworks Hotel and the
Aachen Hotel
(map).
For those who wish to drive, the best option for car parking will be Mount Pleasant Car Park (
map), which
costs £4 a day, closes at 8pm, and is less than a 10 minute walk to Campus (
map).
For more information, please contact the organisers:
David Babarinde, Kingston University, London. email: K1540683@kingston.ac.uk
Stephen Daniel, University of Liverpool, email:
s.j.daniels@liverpool.ac.uk

24th September 2018

BUIRA Conference 2019 - Newcastle

The 2019 BUIRA conference will be held in Newcastle, 1-3 July 2019.  Please mark the date in your diary.  The call for papers will follow soon.

BUIRA

24th September 2018

The 2018 edition (no. 39) of Historical Studies in Industrial Relations will be published this week.

 
The 2018 edition (no. 39) of Historical Studies in Industrial Relations will be published this week. 
 
Contents
 

James Moher: The Combination Laws and the Struggle for Supremacy in the Early Engineering Trades: The London Society of Journeymen Millwrights

Adrian Williamson: Lyons v. Wilkins and the Right to Peacefully Persuade

Andrew Perchard and Keith Gildart: ‘Run with the fox and hunt with the hounds’: Managerial Trade-Unionism and the British Association of Colliery Management, 1947–1994

Ewan Gibbs and Jim Phillips: Who Owns a Factory?: Caterpillar Tractors in Uddingston, 1956 to 1987

  Roger Undy: The Making of UNITE the Union: The Dynamics of Amalgamation

 

Rebecca Zahn: The ‘European Social Model’ and the UK: From Europeanization to Anglicization

 

Bob Fryer and Steve Williams: Remembering and Honouring NUPE: A Response to Dave Lyddon’s Review Essay on Leadership and Democracy

David S. Rowbottom: A Contribution to the History of the National Union of Public Employees: A View from Cumbria, 1969–1979

 

Book Reviews

Paul O’Leary: Joe England, Merthyr: The Crucible of Modern Wales

Sheila Blackburn: Peter Ackers and Alastair Reid (eds), Alternatives to State-Socialism in Britain: Other Worlds of Labour in the Twentieth Century

Colin Crouch: Werner Bonefeld, The Strong State and the Free Economy


 Back-issues to no. 31/32 (2011) at a discount are available to subscribers.

10th September 2018

AIRAANZ 2019: ''Global Work, Quality Work" 12-14 February 2019, RMIT University, Melbourne

IRAANZ 2019: ''Global Work, Quality Work" 12-14 February 2019, RMIT University,  Melbourne 
 
Submissions are invited for inclusion in the program of the 33rd annual conference of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of  Australia and New Zealand.   
 
The conference theme Global Work, Quality Work?  invites us to consider the dilemmas arising from growing disparities in the quality of jobs and from fragmentation of employment, especially in the context of the rapidly changing landscape of global capitalism, labour regulation, labour migration and labour movements.
 
The contributions of industrial relations scholarship and practice to understanding and responding to the challenges of growing inequalities in employment, pressures on job quality and poor labour market outcomes for diverse groups of workers will set the direction for the conference. Papers that engage with innovative responses to the challenges and issues of regulation, labour organisation and labour movements are of particular interest. 

Along with contributions that address the conference themes, a wide range of papers are invited, drawing on industrial relations, human resources, sociology of work and labour rights scholarship and from local, regional and global perspectives.  For further information and conference streams v isit the Conference ‘Submissions’ page .
 
Key dates:
  • 28 September 2018:  Abstract submissions (non-refereed presentations) close.
  • 18 September 2018:  Extended closing date for Full Paper submissions (to refereed papers stream).
  • 7 December 2018:     Early bird registrations close.
See here for Postgraduate Scholarships and Early Career Researcher Grants and for information about the Vic Taylor conference paper awards. 
 
For full conference details:  http://www.airaanz.org/

10th September 2018

Effort, Participation and Insecurity at Work in Britain:

Effort, Participation and Insecurity at Work in Britain:

First Findings from the Skills and Employment Survey 2017

Date: 1.00pm – 3.45pm, Wednesday 3 October 2018
Venue: Canada Water Culture Space, 21 Surrey Quays Rd, London SE16 7AR.

 

Dear Colleague,

 

The Skills and Employment Survey 2017 is the seventh in a series of surveys stretching back to the mid-1980s.  A second set of results from the survey will be launched on Wednesday 3 October 2018 at Canada Water Culture Space, London (three further reports are available from www.cardiff.ac.uk/ses2017).

 

At this event the authors – Alan Felstead, Duncan Gallie, Francis Green and Golo Henseke – will present headline findings of the survey and outline policy implications relating to three themes:

 

·           Work Intensity

·           Participation

·           Insecurity

 

The event will be chaired by Lesley Giles of the Work Foundation and Cara Maguire member of the Good Work team at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will offer some reflections on the results presented. 

 

The event is free, but places are limited and attendance will be by prior registration only.  If you would like to attend please e-mail k.buckle@ucl.ac.uk by 19 September 2018.

If you require any further information, please contact Katharine Buckle at the SES2017 Conference Desk on Tel: 020 7612 6566.

 

 

First Findings from the Skills and Employment Survey 2017

Date: 1.00pm – 3.45pm, Wednesday 3 October 2018
Venue: Canada Water Culture Space, 21 Surrey Quays Rd, London SE16 7AR.

 

Dear Colleague,

 

The Skills and Employment Survey 2017 is the seventh in a series of surveys stretching back to the mid-1980s.  A second set of results from the survey will be launched on Wednesday 3 October 2018 at Canada Water Culture Space, London (three further reports are available from www.cardiff.ac.uk/ses2017).

 

At this event the authors – Alan Felstead, Duncan Gallie, Francis Green and Golo Henseke – will present headline findings of the survey and outline policy implications relating to three themes:

 

·           Work Intensity

·           Participation

·           Insecurity

 

The event will be chaired by Lesley Giles of the Work Foundation and Cara Maguire member of the Good Work team at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will offer some reflections on the results presented. 

 

The event is free, but places are limited and attendance will be by prior registration only.  If you would like to attend please e-mail k.buckle@ucl.ac.uk by 19 September 2018.

If you require any further information, please contact Katharine Buckle at the SES2017 Conference Desk on Tel: 020 7612 6566.

 

10th September 2018

The Routledge Companion to Employment Relations - FREE ACCESS

Dear Tony Dundon,

 

Congratulations on the publication of your book The Routledge Companion to Employment Relations.

 

Using the following unique link, you can share the book in its entirety.

https://rdcu.be/4foT

Those you share the links with will be able to read the full book online and there are no restrictions on how many people you can send the link to, so please take this unique opportunity to share widely and get people talking about your work.

The links will expire 60 days from today, and whilst everyone will be able to explore the full book online, printing, copying, or downloading will not be available.

10th September 2018

Research Studentship on Climate Change, Labour and Work at Westminster Business School, University of Westminster

Research Studentship on Climate Change, Labour and Work at Westminster Business School, University of Westminster

 

Three years, full time  

£16,000 annual stipend plus fee waiver

 

A full-time University of Westminster PhD Studentship is available in the Centre for the Study of the Production of the Built Environment (ProBE - https://www.westminster.ac.uk/probe) starting in January 2019. This PhD studentship is part of ProBE’s programme of research on Climate Change and Work, conducted in partnership with the York University, Toronto, funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), led by Professor Carla Lipsig Mummé and entitled Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces, an international perspective (ACW - http://www.adaptingcanadianwork.ca/). The programme explores the role of work and global warming and the role of organised workers as a force for adaptation. ProBE is responsible for the international dimension, with projects on green transition strategies and worker agency in Europe and the US, as well as in the built environment. The applicant is expected to have broad knowledge of the field and some experience of quantitative and qualitative research.

 

The closing date for applications is Thursday, 1st November, 2018

 

For further information on how to apply, please visit: https://www.westminster.ac.uk/courses/research-degrees/research-areas/business/how-to-apply

 

When applying please ensure that you quote ‘WBS/ProBE Studentship’

Prospective candidates wishing to discuss an application informally should contact Professor Linda Clarke: clarkel@westminster.ac.uk

20th August 2018

Celebrating and critiquing John Kelly’s Rethinking Industrial Relations

Half day debate and discussion:

Celebrating and critiquing John Kelly’s Rethinking Industrial Relations

 

Wednesday 5 December 2018

Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change (CERIC), University of Leeds

Eventbrite booking details

 

 

 

 

It was just twenty years ago that John Kelly’s Rethinking Industrial Relations (1998) was published. It is one of those rare books to be found on many of the bookshelves of people working in the field of industrial relations. To reflect on the book’s significance, we brought together a number of researchers and scholars to create a special issue of the journal, Economic and Industrial Democracy, to both celebrate as well as constructively critique the contribution Rethinking Industrial Relations has made to subsequent studies of union organising and mobilisation.

 

At its heart, Rethinking Industrial Relations is a forceful and robust critique of the employment relationship and employment relations under capitalism. The book adopts a radical and Marxist perspective––not from the school of academic Marxism––but from activist and political interventionist perspectives, which explains why its interest has spread beyond the academy.

 

We want to push forward the debate and discussion we started in the special edition – not by repeating what was said there by its contributors but rather by asking scholars and practitioners to comment on the papers and to provide questions for discussants (and the audience) to think about future application – both in the academic and in unions and social movements.

 

You are invited to take part in this event and join us for what looks like an enjoyable and thought-provoking day in Leeds in early December. If you would like a ticket for this event then please keep an eye out for a following email.

 

Gregor Gall and Jane Holgate

 

 

Wednesday 5 December 2018: Leeds

 

12.00-12.05

Mark Stuart, CERIC director welcome

12.05-12.30

Why Rethinking Industrial Relations is worth celebrating and critiquing
Speaker: Gregor Gall

12.30-1.45

12.30-1.45 Unions and social movements – can they ever be brothers and sisters in arms?
Speaker: Heather Connolly.  Discussant: Miguel Martinez Lucio
Chair: Gabriella Alberti

13.45-14.00

Break

14.00-15.15

What kind of ‘union organising’ is needed for union renewal?
Speaker: Ian Manborde. Discussant: Melanie Simms
Chair: Ian Greenwood

15.15-15.30

Break

15:30-16:45

How do workers articulate their grievances in a period of strike quiescence?
Speaker: Jean Jenkins. Discussant: Eleanor Kirk
Chair: Charles Umney

16.45-18.00

Reflections on rethinking Rethinking Industrial Relations
Ralph Darlington and John Kelly discussion facilitated by Jane Holgate

18.00

Drinks

 

Contributors

Gabriella Alberti, Associate Professor, Leeds University Business School

Heather Connolly, Associate Professor, University of Leicester

Ralph Darlington, Emeritus Professor, University of Salford

Gregor Gall, Visiting Professor, Leeds University Business School

Ian Greenwood, Associate Professor, Leeds University Business School

Jane Holgate, Professor, Leeds University Business School

Jean Jenkins, Reader, Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University

John Kelly, Professor, Birkbeck, University of London

Eleanor Kirk, Research associate, University of Glasgow

Ian Manborde, Equality and Diversity Organiser, the Equity union

Miguel Martinez Lucio, Professor, Manchester Business School, Manchester University

Melanie Simms, Professor, Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow

Mark Stuart, Professor and CERIC director, Leeds University Business School

Charles Umney, Associate Professor, Leeds University Business School

17th August 2018

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

 

TUC: 150th Anniversary

Walter Citrine and the Changing International Environment, 1920-1945

 

Wednesday 17 October 2018

4.00pm for 4.20-6.30pm (Tea/ coffee from 4.00)

Room tbc, University of Westminster Business School, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)

 

For further details or to reserve a place, please email Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk).

 

Programme:

4.00-4.20pm: Tea/ coffee/ refreshments

4.20-4.30: Welcome: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

 

4.30-5.00: Jim Moher

The TUC leadership and the Left after the General Strike  - Citrine/Bevin - Cripps/Beavan

Walter (Lord) Citrine (1887-1983), General Secretary of the TUC in its heyday – from the General Strike to 1946 – has, largely, but undeservedly, been written out of the history of the Labour movement. He is remembered only for his ABC of Chairmanship, while his stewardship of the TUC, central role as President of the International Federation of Trade Unions (1928-1945) and huge influence on Labour Party policy in the 1930s and 1940s, has been downplayed or ignored. Citrine’s side has rarely been examined but can now be seen to have been far more substantial and significant as a contribution to the Labour movement.

 

5.00-5.30: Jonathan Davis

Searching for Truth in Russia: Walter Citrine’s Soviet Visits in the Interwar Years

The TUC General Secretary Walter Citrine went to the Soviet Union in 1925 and 1935. Touring the country to see how socialism was developing in a country that was seen by many as the vanguard of the international socialist movement, he found reasons to be both optimistic and pessimistic about the development of a left-wing alternative to capitalism. Yet Citrine’s visits have not had the attention they deserve. This talk will therefore consider what Citrine saw when he searched ‘for truth’ in Russia, and it will assess how it contributed to Labour’s socialist identity in the interwar years.

 

5.30-6.00: General discussion

6.00: Close (followed by drinks until 6.30)

 

The speakers:

Dr Jim Moher is a former union national official (T&GWU and CWU) and Labour councillor, turned historian. He has published a chapter on Walter Citrine: A Union Pioneer of Industrial Cooperation in Alternatives to State-Socialism in Britain (editors P. Ackers & A. Reid, Palgrave, 2017), as well as other pieces on Citrine. He is working on the first biography of the TUC leader and is a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London.

 

Dr Jonathan Davis is Senior Lecturer in History and Co-director of the Labour History Research Unit at Anglia Ruskin University. He has published widely on Labour and the Soviet Union and is co-editor of Labour and the Wider World (I. B. Tauris, 2008), Britain’s Second Labour Government, 1929-31: a reappraisal (MUP, 2011), and Labour and the Left in the 1980s (MUP, 2018). He is currently writing a global history of the 1980s for Routledge.

17th August 2018

Hard Times, Hard Choices by Rebecca Gumbrell-McCormick and Richard Hyman

Publication of a paperback edition of Trade Unions in Western Europe
Hard Times, Hard Choices by Rebecca Gumbrell-McCormick and Richard Hyman, with an extensive Afterword which updates the analysis. £24.99. Details at
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/trade-unions-in-western-europe-9780198816782?lang=3n&cc=in

17th August 2018

New BUIRA Honorary Members

Congratulations to Professor Peter Ackers and Professor Ralph Darlington who have both been awarded Honorary Membership of BUIRA in recognition of their contribution to industrial relations and BUIRA.

23rd July 2018

New BUIRA Executive Members

Congratulations to Eve Ewington and Laura William who have both been elected to the BUIRA Executive.

23rd July 2018

BUIRA Conference 2018

Thanks to all who attended the 2018 BUIRA Conference and to the organising team at Middlesex for hosting an excellent event.  Pictures and reports from the conference are available on our Facebook and Twitter accounts @buiraonline  and will be added to the website shortly.

The 2019 conference will be held in Newcastle and we hope to see you all there.

23rd July 2018

Job vacancy: Senior/ Principal Teaching Fellow, Warwick Business School

Job vacancy: Senior/ Principal Teaching Fellow, Warwick Business School

 

Permanent, full time.

 

Salary: £39,992 - £47,722 per annum (Senior Teaching Fellow); £49,149 - £56,950 per annum (Principal Teaching Fellow)

 

Warwick Business School (WBS) is a research-led, triple-accredited university-based business school with globally renowned research credentials and a portfolio of world-class courses.  We are continuing our search for talented individuals to join our faculty. Applications are invited for the post of Senior or Principal Teaching fellow in Human Resource Management.

 

The successful candidate will have a track record of developing and applying innovative teaching methods. Evidence of excellent teaching performance at undergraduate and masters levels would be expected. Candidates will be expected to have experience of undertaking curriculum design and review, and of developing and delivering a range of programmes of study. The successful candidate will be required to contribute broadly to the group’s teaching, potentially covering modules in areas such as Human Resource Management, Employment Relations and International HRM. Applicants that have experience in delivering applied, skills-based HR teaching will be particularly welcome.

 

The ability to contribute to the development of teaching and learning strategies and to provide leadership to others working within programmes as a mentor and colleague are also key features of this position. The successful candidate’s teaching approach is expected to be informed by research within their discipline, as well as their own practice.

 

A good honours degree and a PhD or equivalent in an area related to Employment Relations or Human Resource Management are also required.

 

We are supportive of staff with caring responsibilities including a generous maternity/paternity/adoption/parental leave policy, onsite childcare facilities and the childcare vouchers scheme.

 

The following links provide further details on how to apply:

 

Principal Teaching Fellow

 

Senior Teaching Fellow

 

For informal queries, please contact the Organisation and Human Resource Management Head of Group: Professor Kim Hoque, kim.hoque@wbs.ac.uk

 

Closing date for applications: 8/08/2018

Interview Dates: 18/09/2018 and 19/09/2018

22nd July 2018

Job vacancy: Northern TUC based in Newcastle

https://www.tuc.org.uk/jobs/policy-and-campaigns-support-officer

22nd July 2018

BUIRA Stewardship

It was agreed at the 2018 AGM that a team from Birmingham University will become BUIRA stewards from July 2019.  This follows the end of the term of the current stewardship team at Newcastle University.

22nd July 2018

Publication: Routledge Companion to Employment Relations

The recently published Routledge Companion to Employment Relations may be of interest to our members: 

https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Companion-to-Employment-Relations/Wilkinson-Dundon-Donaghey-Colvin/p/book/9781138911178

30th June 2018

Event: Disclosing versus concealing a mental health problem at work: what do we know and where do we go from here?

Professor Laurent Lapierre Telfer School of Management University of Ottowa, Canada

Wednesday 18th July2018

10:30 – 12:00 (coffee and tea at 10:15)

1.004 Dover St, University of Manchester.

Abstract

Mental health is a growing global concern. For example, 41% of Canadians are at high risk for mental health issues, and recent estimates suggest that 1 in 5 working-age Canadians are adversely affected by a mental health challenge each year. In the UK, the recent results of the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey show that 1 in 6 people over the age of 16 had a common mental health problem in the week prior to being interviewed, and that nearly half of adults think that they have had a diagnosable mental health condition at some point in their life. Mental health problems represent a significant cost to companies stemming from reduced productivity, absences, and turnover (e.g., £35 billion in 2017 in the UK according to the Centre for Mental Health). Despite a notable increase in public attention given to mental health, relatively little is known on how employers, and managers specifically, can best support their employees’ mental health. When struggling with one’s mental health, a highly promising first step toward receiving support at work is to disclose the struggle to one’s manager, who would often be best positioned to provide some type of accommodation. However, many individuals prefer to conceal their challenge, often out of fear of being disadvantaged or treated poorly because of the stigmatization of mental health problems. In this presentation, Prof Lapierre will provide an overview of the limited scholarship addressing employees’ disclosure of a mental health problem. He will also list a series of research questions that he believes should be addressed in order to offer organizations the means of ensuring that their managers create a work climate where their employees feel comfortable revealing their mental health problems, and where such revelation actually leads to positive outcomes.

About the Speaker

Dr Lapierre is the Ian Telfer Professor of Workplace Behaviour and Health. His research focuses mainly on two topics: Occupational health psychology and leadership. His work on the first topic has focused on the intersection of individuals’ work and family lives. He has strived to identify how organizational policies, individuals at work (supervisors and coworkers), employees themselves, and their families can each help them experience less work-family conflict, more work-family enrichment, and overall better health. In his work on leadership, Dr Lapierre has been giving particular attention to relational dynamics between managers (supervisors) and each of their employees (subordinates). More recently, he has focused on the influence that individuals’ acts of followership can have on others’ leadership.

28th June 2018

Vacancies at University College Dublin

 The full job reference is follows: 010478 Lecturer / Assistant Professor Or Associate Professor in Human Resource Management/International Human Resource Management, UCD School of Business, One Permanent Associate Professor Post; and One Temporary 5-year Lecturer/Assistant Professor  
 

Please apply by following the below web link: 

20th June 2018

[ILERA 2018 World Congress] Invitation to the ILERA Council Meeting 

Greetings from ILERA World Congress 2018!

 ILERA World Congress 2018 will be held in Seoul, Korea from July 23 to 27, 2018.

 The ILERA Council will meet on July 25 (Wed.) from 12:30 to 14:00 on the occasion of the Congress in Seoul, Korea. This important meeting aims to discuss the future of ILERA with the Council members.

For more efficient preparation, please let us know who will be attending the meeting by filling out the below form and send it to us via email (info@ilera2018.org) by June 22, 2018.

 

Name

 

Job Title

 

Institution

 

Email

 

*Please reply us even if your country's council member is not able to attend the meeting.

For more details on the Congress, please refer to the official website; http://www.ilera2018.org

 We are looking forward to your prompt response.

 Best Regards,

 Secretariat of ILERA World Congress 2018

9th FL., Samick Lavied'or Bldg., 234 Teheran-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, 06221  Korea 
Tel : +82-2-567-3810, 566-3877 / Fax : +82-2-6254-8049

Website : www.ilera2018.org

18th June 2018

BUIRA is on Twitter and on Facebook!

For the all  latest news, follow BUIRA on Twitter @BUIRAonline and on facebook https://www.facebook.com/BUIRAonline/

 

19th September 2016


Archive