News Room

The latest news from BUIRA

Call for evidence: trade unions in the modern labour market

Commission on Economic Justice report on trade unions and the modern labour market

The IPPR Commission on Economic Justice is seeking evidence for a project on trade unions in the modern labour market. This project will produce a policy report to stimulate wider debate on the topic and will contribute to the Commission’s final report.

The Commission is seeking to understand the causes of the significant decline in union membership and collective bargaining since 1979, and the impact this decline has had on the UK economy and labour market. We will seek out best practice in the movement, and highlight where trade unions have innovated to adapt to a changing labour market. The project will set out what role trade unions could play in the labour market in the future, and outline changes that may be necessary to support this.

The closing date for submissions is 30 March 2018. Please send your comments, by this date (or sooner), to Joe Dromey, Senior Research Fellow at evidence@ippr.org, with the subject line ‘Trade unions’. If you will have material that is only available to send after the closing date we would still be pleased to receive it, though may not be able to use it in our initial research.

23rd February 2018

Critical realism in practice: Applications in management and organisation studies

Critical realism in practice: Applications in management and organisation studies

11th May 2018, 9.30am-4.30pm, Partners Room

Newcastle University Business School

 

Keynote speakers

Dr Scott Hurrell (University of Glasgow)

Prof Monder Ram (University of Birmingham)

Prof Steve Vincent (Newcastle University)

 

Call for papers

Critical realism (CR) is an increasingly prominent meta-theory in management and organisational studies, but practical illustrations of how CR can be applied in research practice are still relatively infrequent. Our one-day symposium seeks to bring together postgraduate and early-career researchers with interests in the sociology of work, employment relations, careers, professions, organisations and cognate research areas, and learn about the variety of ways and contexts in which CR can be applied in empirical research.

 

This event seeks to provide an open, imaginative and supportive forum to present and discuss ideas, receive advice from the leading CR experts, and meet other scholars with similar research interests. Therefore, we are pleased to invite submissions of abstracts (up to 250 words) from postgraduate and early-career researchers applying (or considering opportunities to apply) CR to study issues relevant to management and organization studies. ‘Work in progress’ submissions are welcome. Potential areas to present on include (but are not limited to):

 

  • skills and skill formation systems;
  • labour markets;
  • employment relationship;
  • identity;
  • workforce diversity;
  • careers;
  • entrepreneurship.

 

Abstract submission deadline: April 15th 2018

Please submit your abstracts to: Toma Pustelnikovaite (tp27@st-andrews.ac.uk)

 

Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please specify dietary requirements or accessibility needs at the time of booking. Attendance without presenting at the symposium is also welcome.

 

Delegate rates: BSA Member Registration £5, Non-Member Registration £15.

 

For conference and academic enquiries please contact Andrew Kozhevnikov (a.kozhevnikov@newcastle.ac.uk)

22nd February 2018

Fourth Bi-Annual Fairness at Work Conference - 10-11 Sept 2018, Work & Equalities Institute, University of Manchester [DEADLINE EXTENDED]

The University of Manchester

Work & Equalities Institute (WEI)

 

Fourth Bi-Annual Fairness at Work Conference

'Justice at Work: Challenges and Possibilities’

 

Date: 10th & 11th September 2018

Venue: The University of Manchester

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Deadline for abstracts: 31st of March 

 

Building on the three previous Fairness at Work Conferences at the University of Manchester (in 2012, 2014, and 2016), the 2018 conference aims to bring together academics and practitioners to discuss strategic issues on the subject of justice and fairness at work. The last two years have seen a major shift in the political environment and an emergence of a politics of national insularity. Yet at the same time major strides have been made in raising awareness and support for living wage campaigns and improving workplace justice.   The conference aims to discuss developments in our understandings of the impact of technological changes (e.g. the gig economy), the changing experiences of work amongst groups of vulnerable workers (e.g. younger workers), the impact of an increasingly hostile context on notions of justice and fairness at the workplace (e.g. a greater challenge to minority rights) and the responses and roles of trade unions and other civil society organisations in dealing with such challenges.

 

The conference is being held in Manchester at the same time as the 150th Annual Conference of the UK’s Trade Unions Congress and will organise sessions linked to the TUC conference themes, with invited speakers and activities focused on the future of trade unions and worker regulation and rights.  The TUC was founded in Manchester in 1868 and the WEI Fairness at Work conference will include social and cultural activities linked to the labour history and struggles for equality of the city. 

    

Papers are invited on these developments in the areas of fair treatment at work, diversity and equality, stress and well-being, dignity at work, employment regulation, worker participation, trade unionism, technology and work, and key elements of employment relations such as pay, pensions and working time.

 

Cost: £200 Waged (£50 unwaged): includes all food and drink plus the conference dinner

Abstract submission: Please email 500-word abstracts or 1000-word for sessionsby 31st  March 2018 tofairwrcconferences@mbs.ac.uk 

 

About the Work & Equalities Institute: The Work & Equalities Institute brings together the European Work and Employment Research Centre and Fairness at Work Research Centre with expertise across human resource management, industrial relations, labour economics, organisational psychology, and employment law. The team has a track record, built over more than twenty five years, of informing the evidence-base and policy agenda of the European Commission, the European Parliament, and the United Nations’ International Labour Organisation, as well as national organisations such as the Equality and Human Rights Commission, and others. WEI’s research is being used in knowledge exchange, dialogue and debate with key stakeholders and policy makers, and makes informed contributions to policy formation and practice.https://www.mbs.ac.uk/research/centres-and-institutes/work-and-equalities-institute/

20th February 2018

Call for Papers - special issue on ‘ Beyond the Department: HRM as a Shared Function’, Baltic Journal of Management

The call for papers can be accessed here:

 http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/call_for_papers.htm?id=7688 . 

16th February 2018

ILERA Announcement - Online course on Shaping the Future of Work

Shaping the Future of Work

Explore ways to improve job opportunities and develop a personal plan for lifelong career success

 

This Spring Thomas Kochan, previous ILERA President will offer his free eight-week online course, 15.662x: 
Shaping the Future of Work, for the third time since 2015.

The goal of this course is to explore and develop plans of action for improving the job and career opportunities for today and tomorrow’s workforce. It also help students understand and better address the deep divisions and inequalities in societies that threaten the future of our economies and democracies. The course will allow for individuals from all across the globe to create a better future by building a stronger network of businesses, employees, labor organizations, and their communities.

 

“We use the metaphor of “Building a New Social Contract” to organize the task we face and the options we might consider, while shaping the future trajectory of employment. Together we will learn how business, education, labor, government, and the workforce can work together to produce more good jobs and careers, thriving businesses and economies and in doing so help to close the deep divisions and address the frustrations that are all too apparent in our society.”

 

“I would like to invite you, your students, and your colleagues to take part in the class. In order to get a better sense of the course layout, you can watch the introduction piece here. If you have any further questions, please feel free to reach out to us. We would love to have you on board and share the information with your potentially interested students. “

 

Thomas Kochan and 15.662x Course Team

Starts on 20 March 2018 - Enrol here

16th February 2018

Green Jobs and Sustainability

Seminar jointly organised by the ‘Alternative Organisations and Transformative Practices’ and the ‘Sustainable Development’ clusters

 

Date and time: 22nd of March 2018, 13.15-15.00

Location: C205, College BuildingMiddlesex University, The Burroughs, London NW4 4BT

 

Tickets: Entry is free and open to all. Please register here to reserve your place: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/green-jobs-and-sustainability-tickets-42751809814

 

 

***Refreshments will be served***

 

 

Saving and providing low-carbon energy are great challenges of our times, as the by-products of combustion of oil, gas, coal and other materials contribute to climate change, air-pollution, natural disasters, and diseases. Low-carbon housing and energy generation are essential for the survival of life on this planet. Both require NEW technology and NEW ways of working.

 

After some dire post-financial and economic crisis years, policy makers and academics are excited about the opportunities for creating employment and stimulating European economies provided by the rising awareness of the negative impact of environmental pollution and climate change. Climate change and how societies engage in technological and social innovation are questions of social, ecological and economic sustainability. In this seminar, we ask

 

How can the turn to energy saving and low-carbon energy generation contribute to more and better employment across European economies?

 

We invite academics and PhD students from various disciplines to join us for a lively exchange of ideas. 

 

Speakers

 

Prof Linda Clarke (Professor of European Industrial Relations in the Westminster Business School) and Dr. Melahat Sahin-Dikmen (Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the Production of the Built Environment (ProBE), Westminster Business School) on

 

'Challenges for vocational education and training for low energy construction in Europe: divergent contexts, approaches and practices'

 

Dr Robert Gross (Reader in Energy Policy and Technology and Director of the Centre for Energy Policy and Technology (ICEPT) at Imperial College London) on

 

'Low carbon jobs, what is the evidence? The UKERC systematic review'

 

Dr Lisa Schulte (Lecturer in HRM and Organisational Behaviour, Middlesex University) (Initiator of this seminar) on

 

'Job Quality in the Danish, English and German Offshore Wind Turbine Industry'

 

Chair: Dr Anne Daguerre (Associate Professor in Work Employment and Welfare, Middlesex University)

 

Sponsor: Research Facilitation Funding Grant – Middlesex University Business School

16th February 2018

Call for Papers: HR Division International Conference (HRIC), Dublin 2019

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the 3rd HR Division International Conference (HRIC) 2019 to be hosted by Dublin City University, 9-11th of January, 2019.

Reflecting the AOM’s increasingly diverse membership base, the HRIC conferences are designed to further integrate the global community and disseminate HR knowledge to management researchers and practitioners wherever they live and work. Building on the successes of the first HRIC in Beijing, China (2014), and the second HRIC in Sydney, Australia (2016), the third HRIC, seeks to advance of understanding of HRM in the global context under the theme of Navigating the Shifting Landscapes of HRM’. This theme allows for conversation and debate on key changes and challenges confronting HRM as framed by factors such as resurgent nationalism and the (im)mobility of talent, the future of work and employment, and the implications of the HR/technology interface.

As a result of its status as an MNC and talent hub, Dublin offers the perfect vantage point to evaluate the shifting landscape of HRM. Dublin City University (DCU) is conveniently located in North Dublin  between the airport and the city centre. DCU is Ireland’s fastest growing university, while the business school is one of only two schools in Ireland to hold AACSB accreditation.

Further details can be found in the attached call for papers and via http://hric2019.org/

Deadline for submissions is 18th of May, 2018

We look forward to your submissions and to welcoming you to Dublin in January, 2019!

Best wishes,

Brian Harney & David Collings

Conference Chairs HRIC 2019

e: hric2019@dcu.ie

16th February 2018

University of Manchester's Work & Equalities Institute Research Seminar: "Strategies for flexibility in a disconnected world"

University of Manchester

Work & Equalities Institute (WEI)

Research Seminar

 

 

Strategies for flexibility in a disconnected world

Wednesday 21th February 2018

15:30 - 17:00 Hrs (coffee and tea at 15:15)

Alliance Manchester Business School East, Room B5

 

Speaker:        Professor Stephen Procter, Newcastle University Business School

 

Discussants:  Dr Andrew Smith, Bradford University

                      Professor Jill Rubery, Work & Equalities Institute, University of Manchester

 

Abstract

 

This paper makes connections between three things: financialisation, flexibility and strategic HRM. It is argued first of all that financialisation should be understood as an intensification of long-standing pressures on organizations. Picking up on themes of flexibility first developed twenty years ago in the model of the ‘new flexible firm’, the impact of financialisation on the structural flexibility of large UK organizations is examined. Consideration of financialisation also provides a link to the disconnected capitalism thesis, with its implications for strategic HRM. While recognising the strength of the thesis, it is argued that there are also other ways of explaining HRM’s failure to deliver on its promises. The third side of our triangle links flexibility with strategic HRM, and draws on research that looks at whether flexibility and fit should be seen as complements or as substitutes for each other. This is looked at in relation to financialisation, in an attempt to provide a framework in which current developments can be located in their wider and more long-term context.

 

                                                                                                                                             

About the Speaker

 

Professor Stephen Procter is Alcan Chair of Management at Newcastle University Business School. His research has focused on the contemporary restructuring of work, exploring teams and teamworking as central elements of this restructuring. His focus on teamworking developed out of earlier work on workplace flexibility, which dominated debates on restructuring in the early 1990s. In response to these debates, his work put forward the model of the new flexible firm as a means of understanding contemporary developments, which linked workforce flexibility with broader operational and organizational concerns. His more recent research has extended these ideas to provide an understanding of ‘lean’ teamworking, presenting an alternative to the interpretation based simply on work intensification.

 

About the Discussants

 

Dr Andrew Smith is Senior Lecturer in Human Resource Management and Employment Relations at Bradford University School of Management.  Prior to entering academia as a mature student he worked in the civil service and was a trade union representative for the CPSA and PCS unions.  His research interests are in the experiences of work, employment change and the complexities and challenges of work-life ‘balance’. He has published in the journals ‘Work, Employment and Society’, ‘New Technology, Work and Employment’ and the ‘Industrial Relations Journal’.  Andrew is currently working with Dr Jo McBride (Newcastle University) on a new project critically examining the working lives of low-paid workers in multiple legitimate employment.

 

Professor Jill Rubery has worked at Manchester since 1989, first at the Manchester School of Management at UMIST and since 2004 in Alliance Manchester Business School. She previously worked at the Department of Applied Economics at Cambridge University. Professor Rubery is the Director of the Work and Equalities Institute at Alliance Manchester Business School. She was previously Deputy Director of Alliance Manchester Business School (2007-2013) and head of the People, Management and Organisation Division (2004-2009). In 2006 she was elected a fellow of the British Academy and an emeritus fellow of Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge.

16th February 2018

Event - Labour Abuse

Labour Abuse

Dr Roberto Pedersini (University of Milan) Coping with fraudulent work in the European Union

Nick Clark (Middlesex University) One law for the rich… Case studies from the Unpaid Britain project

 

Friday 23 February 2018, 10.30am – 12.30pm, followed by buffet lunch 

University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS

(opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)
Room 
CG44

 

For further details and to reserve a place, contact Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk)

 

This regular monthly seminar is focused on the 

 

Roberto Pedersini presents the main findings of a study carried out on behalf of the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Eurofound) on the different types and diffusion of fraudulent work in the European Union and the responses that public authorities and social partners have developed to address the challenges posed. Three forms of contracting work are most affected by fraudulent uses - self-employment, fixed-term work and the posting of workers, whilst the social partners mainly operate to increase commitment to compliance. Nick Clark will report on the Unpaid Britain project, examining the phenomenon of unpaid wages, in particular in the London labour market. While secondary data analysis and primary research on Employment Tribunal judgements have revealed much, a series of case studies have provided fascinating insights into this most fundamental breach of the work contract.

 

Roberto Pedersini is Associate Professor of Economic sociology at the Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy. His current research interests concern labour market regulation and policies and industrial and employment relations at both national and international level. He has collaborated in research projects with the International Labour Office, the European Commission and the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions and was the Chief Editor of the 2014 edition of the biennial European Commission’s Industrial Relations in Europe report. His recent publications include: Exploring the fraudulent contracting of work in the European Union (2016, with Massimo Pallini); What Kind of Europeanization? How EMU is Changing National Industrial Relations in Europe (2015, with Lorenzo Bordogna); Coping with the crisis in Italy: Employment relations and social dialogue amid recession (2014, with Marino Regini).

 

Nick Clark, Research Fellow at Middlesex University Business School has a background in practice, having worked in trade union research and policy environments for 26 years before joining the Working Lives Research Institute in 2009, moving on to Middlesex University in 2015. His academic research has built on practical knowledge of wage bargaining, labour markets, migrant workers and employment rights, using mixed methods of documentary and legal case research, primary and secondary data analysis, and interview. 

 

This seminar is an opportunity to air and discuss these issues in an open forum and consider their implications for industrial relations. Anyone interested is welcome to attend this event. These meetings can be full though so, if you would like to attend and to help forecast catering provision, please Contact: Professor Linda Clarke,  clarkel@wmin.ac.uk or 020350 66528

9th February 2018

Role(s) available - BUIRA PhD Network Facilitators

Expressions of interest are currently open for doctoral students to become BUIRA PhD Network facilitators. The role predominantly involves organising an annual PhD symposium, held in 2017 at Cardiff University, and a session/day for PhD students at the annual BUIRA conference, to be held this year in June at Middlesex University, along with sending out the occasional newsletter to Network members.
The beauty of the role is that you are free to shape the Network in any way you like, helping to provide facilitators with a great opportunity into not only understanding how to run a research network, but also in how to develop it to fit your own and member's interests (valuable skills to demonstrate that you possess for academic careers post-PhD). You will also gain important insights into how BUIRA is run as a wider organisation, with facilitators having a seat on the BUIRA Executive Board. Furthermore you will gain experience in an area equally as important for future academic careers: the ability to plan, design, and run successful conferences and events, perhaps the most fulling part of the Network facilitator role
 
Do please get in touch with Calum Carson at ipi5cic@leeds.ac.uk if you would be interested in coming on board as a facilitator, or if two or more of you would like to put yourselves forward as a team.

9th February 2018

Fully Funded Research Studentships Available

Middlesex University Business School is offering 4 fully funded research studentships for 2018Among areas of study that are offered, the following may be of interest for BUIRA members

 

  • Behavioural economics
  • Gender and diversity in business and the workplace
  • Global employment relations
  • International business and organisations
  • Social enterprise, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development

 

Application deadline: Friday 16 March 2018, 12.00pm

Interviews: Friday 20 April 2018

Studentship start date: Monday 24 September 2018

 

More details and application:

http://www.mdx.ac.uk/courses/research/research-studentships

9th February 2018

9th February 2018

Brexit and the Future of Employment Rights’ – Joint MIRS/ILS meeting

Brexit and the Future of Employment Rights

Joint meeting of the Manchester Industrial Relations Society (MIRS)

and Industrial Law Society (ILS)

Speakers: Professor Catherin Barnard (Professor of EU Law and Employment Law, Trinity College, University of Cambridge)

Professor Keith Ewing (Professor of Law, King’s College, London)

http://www.mirs.org.uk/index.html

Thursday 1 March 6pm
Lecture Theatre G33, Ground Floor
Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
All Saints, Oxford Road (near Oxford Road railway station), Manchester M15 6BH
Map:  http://www.mmu.ac.uk/travel/allsaints/

 

The Brexit vote and its aftermath – Cameron’s fall, May’s catastrophic snap election, the internal divisions between ‘remainers’, ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ Brexiters, and the prospect of crashing out of the European Union without a deal on 29 March 2019 – have thrust Britain into a period of serious political instability. In the process, the shadow of the vote to leave the EU has thrown the future of employment law into uncertainty, with the potential for the erosion of workers’ rights, the overturning of cases won on EU-derived principles, and the pressure to join a race to the bottom on labour law when negotiating new international trade deals. And what about remedies and the enforcement of those rights with access to the European Court of Justice denied? Professors Catherine Barnard and Keith Ewing will provide a lively discussion of these and other Brexit related challenges, and will advance proposals for better employment law.

 

For further details of the Manchester Industrial Relations Society see:

MIRS Secretary: Professor Ralph Darlington r.r.darlington@salford.ac.uk

MIRS website: www.mirs.org.uk and Twitter: @ManchesterIRS

9th February 2018

Event - Machines & Measure

Hosted by University of Leicester School of Business, Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy (CPPE) & Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) South Group

Friday 16th February

11.30 Registration

12.00– 17.30 Talks, discussions

Location: Leicester Creative Business Depot A five minute walk from the train station, this is a great location in Leicester’s cultural quarter.

Eventbrite: REGISTER

Please only register if you intend to come.

Please email me for any other information at pvm.doc@gmail.com and/or from 02/01/18 pm358@le.ac.uk

How are machines being used in contemporary capitalism to perpetuate control and to intensify power relations at work? Theorizing how this occurs through discussions about the physical machine, the calculation machine and the social machine, this workshop re-visits questions of the incorporation and absorption of workers as appendages within the machine as Marx identified as well as new methods to numerate without, necessarily, remuneration. Speakers ask to what extent control is underway via intensified methods to capture labour power, including affective and emotional labour; and will identify how calculation and numeration serve to abstract labour through prediction, prescription, monitoring and tracking; on the streets, in homes, offices and factories. The ‘black box’ argument currently fashionable in debates, where digitalized management methods are a(e)ffectively obscured, is challenged, by identifying precisely how algorithmic decisionmaking, automation and machine learning processes operate to control workers and by theorizing the implications of measure inside human/machine experiences of relations of production.

Kendra Briken (University of Strathclyde) ‘Welcome within the machine. Human-machine relations on the shop floor’

Frank Engster (Helle Panke, Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung) ‘Measure Machine Money’

Alessandro Gandini (King’s College, London) ‘Labour Process Theory and the Gig Economy’

Simon Joyce (Leeds University) ‘Digitalized Management Methods. Black Box or Hidden Abode?’

Adrian Mengay (Friedrich Schiller University Jena) ‘Digitalization of work and heteronomy’

Phoebe Moore (University of Leicester) ‘Quantification of A(e)ffective Labour for Change Management’

 

PAPER ABSTRACTS 

Welcome within the machine. Human-machine relations on the shop floor.

Kendra Briken (University of Strathclyde)

This paper will discuss new technologies that lead to qualitatively new human-machine relations (data gloves, co-bots, data glasses, handheld scanner) used on the shop floor in manufacturing (in a broad sense, encompassing also work in fulfilment centres). Based on the (few) existing empirical studies as well as on company and consultancy reports, the aim is to re-visit the incorporation and absorption of the human worker as a mere appendage within the machine as described by Marx. With machines the more and more said to be involved in problem solving by communicating with each other, the question is: What role for the human? Opposed to the debates about the robots taking over jobs, the paper argues that we will instead see a (longer) transition phase where workers might end up in becoming a new appendage in the workplace. Not being off work but also no longer controlling the machines. The paper wants to overcome the well-known debates about de- and upskilling by using the works of i.e. Donna Haraway to focus on the connexion between the body and the machines.

Measure Machine Money.

Frank Engster (Helle Panke, Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung)

In capitalisms, machines become specific capitalist machines simply because, as e.g. Heidegger, Simondon or Deleuze and Guattari have shown, we must understand the machine from their context: from their non-technical essence, from their connection with other machines, and from the essence of the machinic. This context, first of all and in the last instance, is the relation with the capitalist economy. This determination by capitalist economy can be shown for three different machines: the physical machine, the calculation machine and the social machine: money. What all three have in common and almost defines them as machines is that all three quantify. The classical physical machine quantifies the relation of nature, the calculation machine quantifies information and meaning, and the money machine quantifies social relations.

Labour Process Theory and the Gig Economy.

Alessandro Gandini (King’s College, London)

This article aims to develop a labour process theory approach to address the forms of labour increasingly often referred to as a ‘gig economy’. Supported by empirical illustrations from existing research, the article discusses the notions of ‘point of production’, emotional labour and control in the ‘gig economy’, to argue that labour process theory offers a unique set of tools to observe the way in which labour-power comes to be transformed in a commodity in a context where the encounter between supply and demand of work is mediated by a digital platform. This is characterised by a subjection of social relations to processes of valorisation centred on data and metrics – particularly feedback, ranking and rating systems – that serve purposes of managerialisation and organisation of work in a context where managers and workers are not physically co-present.

Black Box or Hidden Abode: Control and Resistance in Digitalized Management.

Phoebe Moore, University of Leicester and Simon Joyce, Leeds University

Digitalized management methods (DMM) are becoming widespread with the use of big data and algorithmic distribution of work, the use of people analytics, bogus self-employment and an ‘always on’ culture of work and boundary permeability, in the streets and in homes as well as factories and offices. Resistance to these methods has been relatively fast to emerge, however, both at the individual informal level, or with ‘everyday forms of resistance’ a la de Certeau, and in the formal collective responses which are now being seen in trade union responses internationally. In that light, the paper first outlines the control and resistance model seen in labour process research. Secondly, we outline the environments where digitalization is occurring and the DMM seen therein. Peppered with empirical evidence obtained by the current authors, we note the significance of the methods being applied and how, precisely, they work to abstract labour via quantification. We claim that the ‘blackbox’ response is a mythology that obscures power relations underpinning the control aspects of DMM, where many techniques seen in DMM reflect age-old approaches. Thirdly, we outline where resistance is emerging. We conclude that while there has been significant uptake in DMM in several sectors in ways that make it look like we are dealing a nearly universal ‘uberized’ work paradigm that has begun to infiltrate labour markets across the world, resistance emerging and their integral negotiations indicate that this trend is not a fait accompli. Rather, it is to be seen to what extent digitalized methods will become hegemonic.

Digitalization of work and heteronomy

Adrian Mengay (Friedrich Schiller University Jena)

This paper involves, firstly, theoretical remarks, and then a discussion of the German Reference Architectural Model Industrie 4.0 (RAMI 4.0). The digitalization of work is changing the workplace, the medium, relations and content of work. This it is affecting the autonomy of employees. The objective is first to discuss how, why und under which conditions digitalization of work affects autonomy and secondly to understand how it can be used  as a management tool for the extension of heteronomy and the restructuring of work. The digitization of information and processes creates digital data which enables the application of algorithm based forms of processing, measurement, evaluation and benchmarking. I will examine how the digitalization of work favours a structuring and standardization of work and will discuss some practical experiences.

Quantification of A(e)ffective Labour for Change Management.

Phoebe Moore (University of Leicester)

Sensory and tracking technologies are being introduced into workplaces in ways Taylor and the Gilbreths could only have imagined. As corporate wellness initiatives proliferate, work design experiments seek to merge wellness with productivity measure and modulate and quantify the affective and emotional labour of resilience that are necessary for surviving the turbulent early days of Industry 4.0, where workers are expected to take symbolic direction from machines. The Quantified Workplace project (QW) where algorithmic devices were used to quantify labour during a period of corporate merger in Rotterdam over the course of one year, demonstrate how affect is measured during a move toward agile systems and thus the seemingly inevitable conditions of transformation and disruption-because machines accelerate and transform, workers must do so likewise. Projects like QW are evidence of capital’s accelerated attempts to capture more areas of work and to facilitate the conversion of labour power into a source of value, using new technologies. Participants’ responses to participation in the project reveal tensions in the labour process when affect is measured in processes of corporate change.

9th February 2018

Special Issue: Human resources and workplace innovations: practices, perspectives and paradigms

This Special Issue is a tribute and dedication to the late Professor Tom Redman

Personnel Review: Volume 46 Issue 7.Special Issue: Human resources and workplace innovations: practices, perspectives and paradigms -- Guest editorial, Greg J. Bamber, Timothy Bartram and Pauline Stanton:http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/pr/46/7

HRM and workplace innovations: formulating research questionsGreg J. BamberTimothy BartramPauline Stanton (pp. 1216 - 1227)

HRM and innovative work behaviour: a systematic literature reviewAnna Bos-NehlesMaarten RenkemaMaike Janssen (pp. 1228 - 1253)

Disentangling workplace innovation: a systematic literature reviewIryna Prus,Raoul C.D. NacamulliAlessandra Lazazzara (pp. 1254 - 1279)

Employee share ownership and organisational performance: a tentative opening of the black boxKeith WhitfieldAndrew PendletonSukanya SenguptaKaty Huxley (pp. 1280 - 1296)

Why sharing is synergy: The role of decentralized control mechanisms and centralized HR capabilities in creating HR shared service valueMarco MaatmanJeroen Meijerink (pp. 1297 - 1317)

High-performance work system and employee creativity: The roles of perceived organisational support and devolved managementGuiyao Tang,Bingjie YuFang Lee CookeYang Chen(pp. 1318 - 1334)

Strategic flexibility, innovative HR practices, and firm performance: A moderated mediation modelLin Xiu,Xin LiangZhao ChenWei Xu (pp. 1335 - 1357)

Contextual ambidexterity and innovation in healthcare in India: the role of HRMAshish MalikBrendan Boyle,Rebecca Mitchell (pp. 1358 - 1380)

Innovation programs at the workplace for workers with an intellectual disability: Two case studies in large Australian organisationsHannah MeachamJillian CavanaghAmie Shaw,Timothy Bartram (pp. 1381 - 1396)

Are new organisations at the cutting edge of employment relations innovation?David PeetzOlav MuurlinkKeith TownsendAdrian WilkinsonMadeleine Brabant (pp. 1397 - 1413)

Independent professionals and the potential for HRM innovationTui McKeownRobyn Cochrane (pp. 1414 - 1433)

Opening the black box: The mediating roles of organisational systems and ambidexterity in the HRM-performance link in public sector organisationsGeoff PlimmerJane BrysonStephen T.T. Teo(pp. 1434 - 1451)

 

9th February 2018

Launch of the Work and Equalities Institute

The University of Manchester has created a new Work and Equalities Institute following the merger of the European Work and Employment Research centre and the Fairness at Work Research Centre.

See more about The Work and Equalities Institute here.

You are invited to the launch of The Work and Equalities Institute
on Wednesday 14 March 2018 at The University of Manchester.

The theme of the launch is
Debating the future of work and equalities in the fourth industrial revolution
in the birthplace of the first industrial revolution

You will find further details of the event here.

2nd February 2018

Work and Equalities Seminar series

Work and Equalities Institute, The University of Manchester

 

Research Seminars 2017-2018, Semester 2

 

 

Strategies for Flexibility in a Disconnected World

Professor Stephen Procter, Newcastle University Business School

Discussants:             Dr Andrew Smith, University of Bradford

                                 Professor Jill Rubery, University of Manchester

Wednesday 21st February 2018

15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Alliance Manchester Business School East, Room B5

 

 

National approaches to innovation: Robotics and the implications for work

Professor Caroline Lloyd, Cardiff University

Wednesday 21st March 2018

15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Alliance Manchester Business School East, Room B4

 

 

Revisiting the ‘Japanization of British Industry’: The Contemporary State of Shop-Steward Organisation in the UK Car Industry

Dr Niall Cullinane, Queen’s University Belfast

Wednesday 18th April 2018

15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Alliance Manchester Business School East, Room B4

2nd February 2018

BUIRA Accounts

The BUIRA accounts are now available for members to view at

https://www.buira.org/accounts

2nd February 2018

Call For Papers - BUIRA Conference 2018: The return of politics to employment relations (27 to 29 June 2018)

The call for papers is now open until 16th February 2018.

Please use template provided below and submit your abstract through the BUIRA website: http://www.buira.org/submit

 

 

BUIRA conference abstract template

Title:

Brief outline (100 words):

Methodology (150 words):

Key findings (250 words):

References:

Please upload a Word file using Arial font, 12pt and double-lined spaced - do not include your name or anything that identifies you. 

 BUIRA Conference 2018

The return of politics to employment relations

Middlesex University, London Wednesday 27 to Friday 29 June 2018

 

Howell (2005) observes that the emergence of the “third system of industrial relations” in the UK – from 1979 - is one that, among the institutional issues, removed employment relations as a high profile political issue in public life.  While the Winter of Discontent made industrial relations the primary political national issue in the 1979 general election, by the time the Employment Relations Bill was being debated in 1998-9 it attracted low key media or even parliamentary attention.  If the neoliberal age has been one which has institutionally sidelined the notion of collective worker representation, it has also been one that has attempted to ideologically individualise the employment relationship into a market transactional one.

In 2017, the situation seems to have changed.  The underlying ideological predisposition that the employment relationship is a consensual voluntary market transaction is a lot less certain among a significant proportion of working people who instead see unfairness and futility.  In the UK, while unemployment is relatively low, ‘underemployment’ and the perceptions of insecurity, precarity, ‘bad jobs’ and inequality are high.  Similar tensions are reported across the developed world.  These changes could be partly the longer-term consequence of the global financial crisis of 2007/8, of global and national austerity or of the way in which globalisation has affected jobs in adjusting the global north to the global south. The politics surrounding the (un)fairness of the system governing work and employment are now acute and are beginning to challenge the assumptions underpinning key institutions governing the system as a whole. 

It is difficult to pin an exact location for this ‘disruption’ but its manifestations are evident.  While workplace collective bargaining remains dormant outside the shrunken domains of public sector and established large employers, the levels of discontent among the ‘unorganised’ are growing. This includes legal and small scale collective challenges to practices associated with the ‘gig economy’ (a prominent theme discussed at BUIRA 2017); and the return of industrial relations policy as a contested ideological agenda at national level politics (with Labour now championing trade union rights and the Conservative government seeming to need to address perceptions of unfairness with a more paternalist reform agenda on issues such as corporate governance and pay inequality.  The Conservatives’ apparent change of direction is of particular interest as it seems to mark an important symbolic break with the cornerstone principle of laissez-faire market individualism that has underpinned government policy since Thatcher in 1979.

Such re-politicisation of work and employment has not just been a UK phenomenon.  The Trump phenomenon in the US, with its rhetoric of protectionism and anti-immigration, has also arguably been based on a populist challenge to the prevailing neoliberal orthodoxy of open markets. .  In France the direction seems to be equal and opposite: the reforming Macron government seems intent on market-based reforms to labour laws more in line with the neoliberal agenda falling out of favour elsewhere.

Although we welcome papers that concern any area of industrial relations, theoretical contributions in relation to the changes we’re observing in the relationship between politics and employment are particularly welcome, as well as papers concerning topics under the following headings:

  • State regulation and unions
  • Individual employment rights and juridification
  • Migration and freedom of movement
  • Work and inequality
  • Corporate governance and worker voice
  • Regulating the gig economy

29th January 2018

Call for the next BUIRA stewardship 2019-2022

Since it was first established, BUIRA has been overseen by a team of stewards and an Executive Board. Currently the stewardship structure includes officers with responsibility for communications, membership, conference/events and financing. The tenure of each stewardship team is 3 years and the team is expected to host the BUIRA annual conference in the last year of tenure.

We are now open to proposals for a takeover of the stewardship after the 2019 annual conference held at Newcastle.  The tenure will be from 2019 – 2022 during which time will include the celebration the 70th anniversary of the establishment of BUIRA.  

Ideally, the stewardship team will be co-located within the same institution, but as discussed at the AGM, proposals for teams made of individuals at different institutions will also be considered.

Proposals should include names of stewards for the following roles:

  • President
  • Treasurer
  • Membership officer
  • Communications officer
  • Conference and Events officer

 

Informal enquiries may be made to jo.mcbride@newcastle.ac.uk and ana.lopes@ncl.ac.uk

25th January 2018

CFP - Fourth Biennial Fairness at Work Conference: Justice at Work: 'Challenges and Possibilities'

Work & Equalities Institute

The University of Manchester 
  

Call for Papers

The Fourth Biennial Fairness at Work Conference  

'Justice at Work: Challenges and Possibilities’


10th & 11th September 2018

 

Building on the three previous Fairness at Work Conferences at the University of Manchester (in 2012, 2014, and 2016), the 2018 conference aims to bring together academics and practitioners to discuss strategic issues on the subject of justice and fairness at work. The last two years have seen a major shift in the political environment and an emergence of a politics of national insularity. Yet at the same time major strides have been made in raising awareness and support for living wage campaigns and improving workplace justice.   The conference aims to discuss developments in our understandings of the impact of technological changes (e.g. the gig economy), the changing experiences of work amongst groups of vulnerable workers (e.g. younger workers), the impact of an increasingly hostile context on notions of justice and fairness at the workplace (e.g. a greater challenge to minority rights) and the responses and roles of trade unions and other civil society organisations in dealing with such challenges.

 

The conference is being held in Manchester at the same time as the 150th Annual Conference of the UK’s Trade Unions Congress and will organise sessions linked to the TUC conference themes, with invited speakers and activities focused on the future of trade unions and worker regulation and rights.  The TUC was founded in Manchester in 1868 and the WEI Fairness at Work conference will include social and cultural activities linked to the labour history and struggles for equality of the city. 

    

Papers are invited on these developments in the areas of fair treatment at work, diversity and equality, stress and well being, dignity at work, employment regulation, worker participation, trade unionism, technology and work, and key elements of employment relations such as pay, pensions and working time.

 

Venue: The University of Manchester

Cost: £200 Waged (£50 unwaged) - includes all food and drink plus the conference dinner

Submission: Please Send 500 word abstracts or 1000 word for sessions by March 1st 2018 tofairwrcconferences@mbs.ac.uk

 

About the Work and Equalities Institute

The Work & Equalities Institute brings together the European Work and Employment Research Centre and Fairness at Work Research Centre with expertise across human resource management, industrial relations, labour economics, organisational psychology, and employment law. The team has a track record, built over more than twenty five years, of informing the evidence-base and policy agenda of the European Commission, the European Parliament, and the United Nations’ International Labour Organisation, as well as national organisations such as the Equality and Human Rights Commission, and others. WEI’s research is being used in knowledge exchange, dialogue and debate with key stakeholders and policy makers, and makes informed contributions to policy formation and practice. For more information, please visit: https://www.mbs.ac.uk/research/centres-and-institutes/work-and-equalities-institute/

19th January 2018

Lecturer / Senior Lecturer Vacancies at Manchester Business School

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Employment Law (permanent):

https://www.jobs.manchester.ac.uk/displayjob.aspx?jobid=14555

 

Lecturer in HRM/Employment Studies (fixed-term 2 years):

https://www.jobs.manchester.ac.uk/displayjob.aspx?jobid=14556

12th January 2018

International Journal of Human Resource Management

International Journal of Human Resource Management

Special Issue on the Regulation of Work and Employment

Volume 28, 2017, Issue 21.

Regulation of work and employment: Advancing theory and research in international and comparative human resource management

Regulation of work and employment: advances, tensions and future directions in research in international and comparative HRM

Jenny K. Rodriguez, Stewart Johnstone & Stephen Procter  

The state and the regulation of work and employment: theoretical contributions, forgotten lessons and new forms of engagement

Miguel Martínez Lucio & Robert MacKenzie

Flexitime and employee turnover: the polycontextuality of regulation as cross-national institutional contingency

Christiana Ierodiakonou & Eleni Stavrou

‘Black Boxes’ and ‘fracture points’: the regulation of gender equality in the UK and French construction industries

Robert Ackrill, Valerie Caven & Jamila Alaktif 

(De) regulation of working time, employer capture, and ‘forced availability’: a comparison between the UK and Cyprus food retail sector

Anastasios Hadjisolomou, Kirsty Newsome & Ian Cunningham

Posting and agency work in British construction and hospitality: the role of regulation in differentiating the experiences of migrants

Gabriella Alberti & Sonila Danaj 

 

Erratum

12th January 2018

Obituary: Sidney Kessler (1928-2017)

 

Sidney Kessler, who has died age 89, was a leading academic, with a significant record of public service in the field of industrial relations.

Modest by background as well by temperament, Sidney was born in Whitechapel, London on 2 October 1928, the son of immigrants who had come to this country from Poland.  Brought-up in the Jewish East End, he was exposed to a highly political left-wing culture. He was regaled by tales from two uncles who had gone back from England to fight for the Bolsheviks in the Russian Revolution and his parents were active in the Workers’ Circle, an organisation set-up to provide welfare support to the local community. 

Securing a first-class honours degree at the London School of Economics, he took up his first permanent job in 1956, as Head of the Research Department at the National Union of Mineworkers. With much of British industry still powered by coal, and comprising over 700,000 members, the NUM, led by Will Paynter and Ernest Jones, was a key economic player. Remarkably, however, the Research Department at the time consisted of Sidney and one secretary. Sidney made lifelong friends in the union movement and retained a strong connection to it, returning in the early 1990s to help the TUC deal with inter-union disputes under the Bridlington Agreement.    

In 1964, Sidney became lecturer in industrial relations at City University, London. In 1978 he was made Professor at City, retiring in 1994 as Emeritus Professor.  When appointed, City had only recently become a university and with a handful of other academics he helped establish it as a leading business school. Indeed, somewhat unusually the MBA established had industrial relations as a popular module. While not a prolific writer, in 1992, he co-authored a book with Fred Bayliss entitled ‘Contemporary British Industrial Relations.’ Mapping the impact of Thatcher governments on industrial relations, the book became a standard student textbook, while retaining credibility as a research monograph.   

Sidney’s parallel involvement in public policy developments was equally noteworthy. He participated in a string of public bodies set- up to support British industrial relations in the 1960s and 70s, a period of considerable industrial strife. Much of this work was undertaken in the wake of the Donovan Commission (1968) recommendations and he worked closely with other members of the ‘Oxford School of Industrial Relations’: Hugh Clegg, Allan Flanders and Bill McCarthy.  Sidney played a leading role in: the National Board for Price and Incomes (as part-time adviser, 1965-70) designed to manage pay policy; the Commission on Industrial Relations (on secondment as a full-time director,1971-74) established to facilitate union and employer efforts to reform collective bargaining; and the Standing Commission Pay Comparability (as part-time advisor 1979-80) created in the aftermath of the ‘Winter of Discontent’, to resolve various public sector pay disputes.

Sidney also became an arbitrator whilst at City, work which lead to the award of an OBE in 1990. He was on the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service’s panel of arbitrators for twenty years. He was also Deputy Chairman of the Central Arbitration Committee over this period, being involved in the early adoption of ‘pendulum arbitration’.

12th January 2018

PhD studentship: Brexit and the Impact on Equality Law and Workers' Rights

PhD studentship: Brexit and the Impact on Equality Law and Workers' Rights (University of Portsmouth, School of Law)
 
Please note this is a proposal that is part of a bursary competition.
 
Project Description
On the 13th July 2017, the UK Government published the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill. Aside from the repeal of the European Communities Act 1972 (and with it the proposed ousting of the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ)), the Bill’s purpose was to ‘convert the acquis’ of EU law and in doing so preserve any EU-derived equality and employment rights. This is a novel and untested mechanism. As such, there is scope, indeed a need, for detailed, original and imaginative research into its efficacy. Some areas in need of research are (but not limited to):

Discrimination, Rights, and Statutory Interpretation
Is it possible for the subsequent judicial interpretation by UK courts of these rights to align with that given by the ECJ, given the different traditions of the respective judicial bodies and/or that the ultimate ‘teleological’ goal of the ECJ is the ‘ever closer union between the peoples of Europe’? There is a likelihood that the converted rights will diminish over time, leaving UK citizens markedly worse off.

Impact on Trade Deals
Another aspect of this is that diminished rights could undermine any Brexit trade deals requiring a ‘level playing field’ of workers’ rights for the purposes of fair trade.

Enforcement of EU Equality and Workers Rights
These rights come to UK citizens through a number of sources, notably Treaty provisions, Directives, and ECJ decisions. But there is a long history of Member States failing to implement properly these rights. In response, the ECJ has developed a number of methods enabling individual citizens to enforce these rights, bypassing their (inadequate) domestic law. If, as expected, the Bill ousts the jurisdiction of the ECJ, how can this route to rights be protected?

An Enhanced Role for the European Convention on Human Rights
As well as the ever-developing equality and employment rights, EU institutions are adopting human rights. As this progresses within the EU, there will appear ‘gaps’ between the rights of EU and UK citizens. One possibility of filling these gaps is harnessing the potential of the European Convention on Human Rights (via the Human Rights Act 1998), or even its lesser-known companion, the European Social Charter.


How to apply:
We welcome applications from highly motivated prospective students who are committed to develop outstanding research outcomes. You can apply online at http://www.port.ac.uk/applyonline. Please quote project code LAWC3900218 in your application form.

Applications should include:
-a full CV including personal details, qualifications, educational history and, where applicable, any employment or other experience relevant to the application
-contact details for two referees able to comment on your academic performance
-a research proposal of 1,000 words outlining the main features of a research design you would propose to meet the stated objectives, identifying the challenges this project might present and discussing how the work will build on or challenge existing research in the above field.
-proof of English language proficiency (for EU and international students)

All the above must be submitted by the 11th of February 2018.
Funding Notes

UK/EU students - The fully-funded, full-time three-year studentship provides a stipend that is in line with that offered by Research Councils UK of £14,553 per annum.

International students - International students applying for this project are eligible to be considered for the Portsmouth Global PhD scholarships. 
 
Further information also at:

5th January 2018

Central London BUIRA Seminar: The Changing Labour Contract

Dr Alexandra Oeser (Université Paris Nanterre) From local to international: wiping out the employer?

Dr Simon Joyce (University of Leeds) on the Future of Work and the Gig Economy

Discussant: Dr Rebecca Gumbrell-McCormick (Birkbeck College London)

 

Friday 26 January 2018, 10.30am – 12.30pm, followed by buffet lunch

University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS

(opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)
Room 
C181 (lunch C287)

 

For further details and to reserve a place, contact Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk)

 

This regular monthly seminar is focused onthe changing labour contract and employee-employer relations in Europe and we are fortunate to have two expert speakers as well as Rebecca Gumbrell-McCormick to lead the discussion.

 

Alexandra Oeser, Associate Professor of Sociology at the Université Paris Nanterre,will tackle the question of the consequences of the financialization of global firms for local fights for employment and for syndicalist strategies. She focusses on the example of the Molex company, which bought a local factory in southern France in 2004 only to relocate it to China in 2008-2009. The fight against the closure of the factory in rural France obeyed different norms from those of the closure itself, decided in Chicago. She will also talk about forms of masculinity used on both levels in the fight, and their consequences for work structures and political mobilization. Alexandra works on questions of political socialization, whether in education (schools), in the workplace or during political mobilizations. Gender and class and their interaction are central to this work and have more recently been explored through analysis of forms of masculinity. Her publications include: "Quand ils ont fermé l'usine. Lutter contre les délocalisations dans une économie globalisée" (When they closed the factory. Fighting against delocalizations in a globalised economy), Agone, 2017; and ‘Politics, Work and the Family: Gendered forms of mobilization of working class women in Southern France’. Modern and Contemporary France, n°22, 2012

 

Simon Joyce will speak about the mediation of paid work via online platforms. Companies such as Uber, Upwork, Taskrabbit, and Amazon Mechanical Turk have pioneered this method of organising a workforce, which is widely expected to grow in importance in coming years. This talk will present research investigating the nature and extent of platform work in Europe, and examine its implications for working lives and for the regulation of employment relations. It will also discuss conceptual and theoretical challenges that these developments pose for for industrial relations scholars and researchers. Simonhas researched platform work in his present position of Research Fellow at Leeds University Business Schoothere as well as at the University of Hertfordshire, where he completed his PhD entitled “Revisiting shop stewards and workplace bargaining: opportunities, resources and dynamics in two case studies”. He is co-author of the recently published research for the European Parliament on The Social Protection of Workers in the Platform Economyhttp://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2017/614184/IPOL_STU(2017)614184_EN.pdf 

 

Rebecca Grumbell-McCormick, has kindly agreed to act as discussant. Rebecca co-authored (with Richard Hyman), ‘Resisting labour market insecurity: Old and new actors, rivals or allies?’ Journal of Industrial Relations, 2017, as well as Trade Unions in Western Europe (2013).

 

This seminar is an opportunity to air and discuss these issues in an open forum and consider their implications for industrial relations. Anyone interested is welcome to attend this event. These meetings can be full though so, if you would like to attend and to help forecast catering provision, please Contact: Professor Linda Clarke, clarkel@wmin.ac.uk or 020350 66528

5th January 2018

WERU/DIG Seminar on Tackling Equality and Diversity

UNIVERSITY OF GREENWICH WORK AND EMPLOYMENT RESEARCH UNIT AND DIVERSITY INTEREST GROUP JOINT SEMINAR
 
ADDRESSING EQUALITY AND INCLUSION IN THE WORKPLACE

WEDNESDAY 17 JANUARY 2018. 15.00 – 18.00 
 
VENUE: ROOM HH102, HAMILTON HOUSE, PARK VISTA, GREENWICH, SE10 9LZ 
 
This seminar focuses on tackling race equality and inclusion in society. Our speakers include Roger Kline (Middlesex University), Dr Kenisha Linton (University of Greenwich) and Michael Seeraj (Charlton Athletic Community Trust). 
 
Roger Kline FRSA (Middlesex University Business School) will speak about his role in developing the NHS Workforce Race Equality Standard. Roger authored “Discrimination by Appointment” (2013) and “The Snowy White Peaks of the NHS” (2014) on workforce race equality in the NHS and subsequently helped develop the NHS Workforce Race Equality Standard. He was Joint Director of its Implementation Team from its inception until August 2017. Roger is a Research Fellow at Middlesex University and he is currently researching bullying in the NHS and the inappropriate use of disciplinary action. He is co-author with Michael Preston Shoot of Professional Accountability in Social Care and Health: Challenging Unacceptable Practice and its Management (Sage 2012) and is author of The Duty of Care (2013). Roger was a member of the Social Work Reform Board (2010–2013), and of the Higher Education Equality Challenge Unit Board (2006-2008).

 

Dr Kenisha Linton (University of Greenwich) will explore diversity perspectives in the complex and dynamic work context of the London Metropolitan Police Service (MPS). Using qualitative data from 85 Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) and White employees from different ranks, age ranges, lengths of service, and mix of genders and sexual orientations, Kenisha will provide empirical evidence on the mediating factors influencing the organisation’s diversity paradigm and the implementation of its diversity strategy. Dr Kenisha Linton is a Senior Lecturer in Human Resources and Organisational Behaviour at the University of Greenwich. Kenisha obtained her PhD at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her doctoral thesis examined the topic of workforce diversity and inclusion in the London Metropolitan Police Service. Kenisha also conducts research on the experiences of black and minority ethnic (BME) staff and students in UK higher education institutions. Kenisha was also a member of Kingston University's self-assessment team for the Race Equality Charter Mark that was piloted by the Equality Challenge Unit in 2015 with thirty HE institutions across England and Wales. Kingston University successfully obtained the bronze award. Kenisha is engaged in various collaborative research projects on equality, diversity and inclusion, intersectionality, leadership, and cross-cultural management.
 
Dr Michael Seeraj (Charlton Athletic Community Trust) will speak about the work of the Charlton Athletic Community Trust. The community programme at Charlton Athletic Football Club was established in 1992 and became Charlton Athletic Community Trust in 2003. The community initiative began when the football club returned to The Valley in 1992. It started with just one member of staff, a bag of footballs and a telephone and has now grown into an organisation that employs 100 permanent staff, has a pool of over 100 casual coaches and engages with thousands of people on a weekly basis. CACT uses the power of football and sport to engage, empower and provide positive opportunities and activities for young people as highlighted in the mission statement. From engagement and early intervention schemes, young people are signposted into positive activities and provided with exit routes into recreational and structured activities run by the Trust and partner agencies. There is emphasis on creating pathways into employment and turning young people into positive role models. These include personal improvement programmes centred on education, health, social inclusion, citizenship and community working across different strands. Dr Michael Seeraj is Head of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion at CACT.

 

This is an open free seminar and all are invited but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by contacting: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/weru-seminar-equality-and-inclusion-in-the-workplace-tickets-41426847817 
 
HOW TO FIND US

Hamilton House, 15 Park Vista, Greenwich, London SE10 9LZ 
Telephone: +44 20 8331 9083 E-mail: i3centre@gre.ac.uk

 

5th January 2018

Manchester Industrial Relations Society (MIRS) Student Debate

You can now access a full report on the recent MIRS Student Debate, as well as the PowerPoint slides from each of the individual teams involved, and a series of speaker/audience photos, via the Society’s website:

www.mirs.org.uk

5th January 2018

Manchester Industrial Relations Society (MIRS) Class and Social Mobility: How to Get a Fairer Society

Speaker: Faiza Shaheen, Director, Centre for Labour and Social Studies (CLASS),

economist, writer, activist and commentator on the most salient social and economic debates of our times, contributor to BBCNewsnight and Channel 4 News

http://www.mirs.org.uk/index.html

Thursday 1 February 6pm
Lecture Theatre G33, Ground Floor
Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
All Saints, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BH
Map:  http://www.mmu.ac.uk/travel/allsaints/

 

Social class is back in media discourse, sometimes in terms of the ‘gross’ financial privileges of the wealthy elite, more often with reference to the perceived Brexit ‘populist backlash’ of the white working class. But how well do we really understand the fundamental underlying reality of social class in 21st century Britain? Faiza Shaheen explores its multifaceted implications for our society (including in areas such as employment, housing, education, healthcare, income, and political power) and then advances her vision for how we can make Britain less class-ridden and more socially mobile for the benefit of all to create a better, fairer society.   

 

Manchester Industrial Relations Society website: www.mirs.org.uk

Twitter: @ManchesterIRS

5th January 2018

PhD Scholarships at Sheffield Hallam University Business School

We are seeking PhD scholarship applications for 3 year funded full-time study with proposed theoretical and managerial implications in the following thematic research areas:


People, Work and Organisation (PWO), including: 

• Human resource management performance, coaching / mentoring
• Culture and language
• Employer relations or employment law
• Low pay and the living wage
• International HRM and cross-management in multinational enterprises,

 

Within the above thematic research areas, we especially welcome proposals with an emphasis on the creation of sustainable social, environmental and economic value in line with the principles of responsible management under the United Nations Global Compact-backed initiative, PRME.

Any enquiries should be emailed to Professor Peter Prowse, Head of PhD Programmes, orDr Christine Gilligan, PhD Admissions Tutor.

Seehttps://www.shu.ac.uk/research/research-degrees/phd-scholarship-opportunities/people-work-and-organisationon how to apply and the selection Process.

19th December 2017

Call for Special Issue Proposals: Human Resource Management Journal

Proposals should be submitted to HRMJ.journal@wiley.com by Monday 5th March 2018. Further information can be found here.

Human Resource Management Journal is a scholarly journal that seeks to promote the understanding of HRM to academics and practising managers. HRMJ aims to promote the theory and practice of HRM, to provide an international forum for discussion and debate, and to stress the critical importance of people management to a wide range of economic, political and social concerns. Over the last decade, HRMJ has broadened its editorial scope to become more globally oriented and has strengthened the international character of its Editorial Team and Board.

Further details on HRMJ can be found below and on the website: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1748-8583.

12th December 2017

Social Europe after Brexit

The University of Greenwich, London, is holding a seminar on ‘Social Europe after Brexit’, hosted by Philippe Pochet, the General Director of the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) and visiting lecturer at the Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL) and the College of Europe.

 

Date: 7th of December 2017

Location: Hamilton House, 15 Park Vista, Park Vista, Greenwich, SE10 9LZ.

Time: 16:00-17:30

 

Go to the website to Book Now.

 

The social dimension of the European Union has been long on the agenda in many different ways. Most people would agree that it has never been the highest on the agenda, but during the last decades there have been major developments with regard to works councils and the European Company Statute. Europe is now in a lot of turbulence, like the refugee crisis but, above all, the Brexit that is dominating all agendas for the moment, nationally as well as at European level. This seminar addresses the question how the development of Social Europe could be affected by Brexit – even if we are uncertain about the form of Brexit and the strategy that has to become clear the next couple of weeks. Some would suggest further progress on this would be damaged with the pulling out of the UK from the EU. Others seem to suggest there is more common understanding among the other EU member states to develop a stronger EU with possibly more support for the social aspects of European integration. Especially the role of social partners will be addressed.

4th December 2017

Academy of Social Sciences | eBulletin November 2017

The eBulletin is available to view online via the following link:
https://www.acss.org.uk/academy-ebulletin-november-2017/

For all news about the Academy and its Campaign visit www.acss.org.uk and campaignforsocialscience.org.uk

 

4th December 2017

The Gig Economy and Employment Relations

Speaker: Alex Wood (Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford).

http://www.mirs.org.uk/index.html

Thursday 30 November 6pm
Lecture Theatre G33, Ground Floor
Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
All Saints, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BH
Map:  http://www.mmu.ac.uk/travel/allsaints/

 

Recent media coverage of the so-called ‘gig economy’ (with companies such as Uber and Deliveroo) has exposed the shocking extent to which employers exploit vulnerable workers by adopting techniques such as wrongly classifying their employment status, employing them on zero hours contracts, and attaching them to online platforms that enable clients to access labour power potentially from anywhere in the world.

 

This presentation will explore what the growth of the gig economy means for employment relations by drawing on 180 worker interviews across eight countries, observation of a dozen worker events in the United States and the Philippines, and a survey of 683 Sub-Saharan and Southeast Asian workers. The findings will focus on the shared injustices, identity, solidarity, collective organisation and repertoires of action displayed by remote gig workers. The presentation will place these findings in historical context, highlighting the practical implications for worker organisation in the 21st century and the conceptual consequences for employment relations as a field of study.      

 

Manchester Industrial Relations Society website: www.mirs.org.uk

Twitter: @ManchesterIRS

29th November 2017

Call For Papers - BUIRA Conference 2018: The return of politics to employment relations (27 to 29 June 2018)

The call for papers is open until 30th January 2018.

Please use template provided below and submit your abstract through the BUIRA website: http://www.buira.org/submit

If you would like to propose a stream or special session, please send a proposal to admin@buira.org by 20th December 2017.

BUIRA conference abstract template

Title:

Brief outline (100 words):

Methodology (150 words):

Key findings (250 words):

References:

 

 BUIRA Conference 2018

The return of politics to employment relations

Middlesex University, London Wednesday 27 to Friday 29 June 2018

 

Howell (2005) observes that the emergence of the “third system of industrial relations” in the UK – from 1979 - is one that, among the institutional issues, removed employment relations as a high profile political issue in public life.  While the Winter of Discontent made industrial relations the primary political national issue in the 1979 general election, by the time the Employment Relations Bill was being debated in 1998-9 it attracted low key media or even parliamentary attention.  If the neoliberal age has been one which has institutionally sidelined the notion of collective worker representation, it has also been one that has attempted to ideologically individualise the employment relationship into a market transactional one.

In 2017, the situation seems to have changed.  The underlying ideological predisposition that the employment relationship is a consensual voluntary market transaction is a lot less certain among a significant proportion of working people who instead see unfairness and futility.  In the UK, while unemployment is relatively low, ‘underemployment’ and the perceptions of insecurity, precarity, ‘bad jobs’ and inequality are high.  Similar tensions are reported across the developed world.  These changes could be partly the longer-term consequence of the global financial crisis of 2007/8, of global and national austerity or of the way in which globalisation has affected jobs in adjusting the global north to the global south. The politics surrounding the (un)fairness of the system governing work and employment are now acute and are beginning to challenge the assumptions underpinning key institutions governing the system as a whole. 

It is difficult to pin an exact location for this ‘disruption’ but its manifestations are evident.  While workplace collective bargaining remains dormant outside the shrunken domains of public sector and established large employers, the levels of discontent among the ‘unorganised’ are growing. This includes legal and small scale collective challenges to practices associated with the ‘gig economy’ (a prominent theme discussed at BUIRA 2017); and the return of industrial relations policy as a contested ideological agenda at national level politics (with Labour now championing trade union rights and the Conservative government seeming to need to address perceptions of unfairness with a more paternalist reform agenda on issues such as corporate governance and pay inequality.  The Conservatives’ apparent change of direction is of particular interest as it seems to mark an important symbolic break with the cornerstone principle of laissez-faire market individualism that has underpinned government policy since Thatcher in 1979.

Such re-politicisation of work and employment has not just been a UK phenomenon.  The Trump phenomenon in the US, with its rhetoric of protectionism and anti-immigration, has also arguably been based on a populist challenge to the prevailing neoliberal orthodoxy of open markets. .  In France the direction seems to be equal and opposite: the reforming Macron government seems intent on market-based reforms to labour laws more in line with the neoliberal agenda falling out of favour elsewhere.

Although we welcome papers that concern any area of industrial relations, theoretical contributions in relation to the changes we’re observing in the relationship between politics and employment are particularly welcome, as well as papers concerning topics under the following headings:

  • State regulation and unions
  • Individual employment rights and juridification
  • Migration and freedom of movement
  • Work and inequality
  • Corporate governance and worker voice
  • Regulating the gig economy

 

 

27th November 2017

Sir Peter Carr 1930-2017 Obituary

Former member of BUIRA, Peter Carr, who has died aged 87, had a remarkable and varied career, including in industrial relations and as a leader of health service improvement. His focus was always on promoting productivity through constructive bargaining as a partnership between employers and workers, represented by unions.

 

Peter grew up in Mexborough, Yorkshire, the son of George Carr, a printer on the South Yorkshire Times, and his wife, Marjorie (nee Tailby), who engaged in entrepreneurial endeavours such as making sandwiches for working men’s clubs. Peter’s first job after leaving school, aged 13, was as a building-site joiner. His leadership skills were already apparent and he was soon working as site manager. This was interrupted by national service with the Royal Air Force mountain rescue team between 1951 and 1953.

 

Sponsored by the woodworkers’ union, he then studied politics and economics at Ruskin College, Oxford. He went on to lecture in Yorkshire and Essex colleges on management, labour history and economics, his students mostly shop stewards and managers. In the 1960s he led pioneering exchange courses between UK, Swedish and French trade unions.

 

Peter took increasingly senior roles in governmental agencies: the Prices and Incomes Board; the Commission on Industrial Relations (CIR); the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas); and the Department of Employment. At the CIR and Acas, he helped to investigate, prevent and settle industrial disputes. Although as a young man he was active in the Labour party and the Fabians, Conservative as well as Labour governments repeatedly re-appointed him to key leadership roles.

 

He led international missions and was labour attaché for the UK government in Washington DC for five years from 1978. He organised study exchanges between US and UK union leaders and employers.

 

When Peter returned to the UK, he applied industrial relations skills as regional director of North East City Action, encouraging economic development. In 1990, he became chair of the Northern (English) Regional Health Authority and in this role, and subsequent ones, he led a transformation of health services. ‘His’ region became the best performing region in the UK National Health Service (NHS). He was knighted in 2007.

 

He went on to chair the English NHS Trust Development Authority, when it was established in 2011. He served diligently in various roles until he was in his mid-80s.

 

His recreations included cinema, photography, cabinetmaking, cycling, cooking and US history. He founded the Northern Screen Commission, which found settings in the north for many films, including from the Harry Potter series. His memoir, It Occurred to Me (2016), humorously charted major moments of political history in which he participated. As a Europhile, he was appalled about Brexit.

 

He is survived by his wife, Geraldine (nee Ward), whom he married in 1958, son, Steve, daughter, Alyce, and four grandchildren. (Condolence Cards to: Lady Geraldine Carr, 4 Corchester Towers, Northumberland NE45 5NP, England. Donations would be welcome to www.parkinsons.org.uk ref. ‘Sir Peter Carr No. 1000420’.)

 

Both the NHS and the US Labor and Employment Relations Association (LERA) recently honoured his many achievements. (Peter’s son Steve said that the lifetime achievement award that LERA awarded to Peter meant more to him than his Knighthood!) Three UK universities conferred hon. doctorates on him. He served in many voluntary roles, including with all of the universities in north east England. For example, he was formerly a member of the Court, Newcastle University and of the Advisory Board, Newcastle University Business School.

 

To celebrate Peter’s life, there will be a memorial event in the Kings Hall at Newcastle University, at 3.30pm on 18 December 2017.  For details contact Melanie Reed, Events Manager, Newcastle University: melanie.reed@newcastle.ac.uk

Those wishing to contribute to the memorial event, please contact Steve:  stevecarr4@me.com

 

This obituary draws on a published obituary that also includes a photo of Sir Peter Carr: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/nov/15/sir-peter-carr-obituary

 

Greg J. Bamber
Professor/Co-Director, Australian Consortium for Research in Employment & Work

Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Visiting Professor, Newcastle University, UK

 

www.linkedin.com/in/gregjbamber

22nd November 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS: Fourth Bi-Annual Fairness at Work Conference: 'Justice at Work: Challenges and Possibilities’, University of Manchester's Work & Equalities Institute (WEI).

The University of Manchester

Work & Equalities Institute (WEI)

 

Fourth Bi-Annual Fairness at Work Conference

'Justice at Work: Challenges and Possibilities’

 

Date: 10th & 11th September 2018

Venue: The University of Manchester

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Building on the three previous Fairness at Work Conferences at the University of Manchester (in 2012, 2014, and 2016), the 2018 conference aims to bring together academics and practitioners to discuss strategic issues on the subject of justice and fairness at work. The last two years have seen a major shift in the political environment and an emergence of a politics of national insularity. Yet at the same time major strides have been made in raising awareness and support for living wage campaigns and improving workplace justice.  The conference aims to discuss developments in our understandings of the impact of technological changes (e.g. the gig economy), the changing experiences of work amongst groups of vulnerable workers (e.g. younger workers), the impact of an increasingly hostile context on notions of justice and fairness at the workplace (e.g. a greater challenge to minority rights) and the responses and roles of trade unions and other civil society organisations in dealing with such challenges.

 

The conference is being held in Manchester at the same time as the 150th Annual Conference of the UK’s Trade Unions Congress and will organise sessions linked to the TUC conference themes, with invited speakers and activities focused on the future of trade unions and worker regulation and rights.  The TUC was founded in Manchester in 1868 and the WEI Fairness at Work conference will include social and cultural activities linked to the labour history and struggles for equality of the city. 

    

Papers are invited on these developments in the areas of fair treatment at work, diversity and equality, stress and well-being, dignity at work, employment regulation, worker participation, trade unionism, technology and work, and key elements of employment relations such as pay, pensions and working time.

 

Cost: £200 Waged (£50 unwaged): includes all food and drink plus the conference dinner

Abstract submission: Please email 500-word abstracts or 1000-word for sessions by 1st  March 2018 tofairwrcconferences@mbs.ac.uk 

 

About the Work & Equalities Institute: The Work & Equalities Institute brings together the European Work and Employment Research Centre and Fairness at Work Research Centre with expertise across human resource management, industrial relations, labour economics, organisational psychology, and employment law. The team has a track record, built over more than twenty five years, of informing the evidence-base and policy agenda of the European Commission, the European Parliament, and the United Nations’ International Labour Organisation, as well as national organisations such as the Equality and Human Rights Commission, and others. WEI’s research is being used in knowledge exchange, dialogue and debate with key stakeholders and policy makers, and makes informed contributions to policy formation and practice.https://www.mbs.ac.uk/research/centres-and-institutes/work-and-equalities-institute/

21st November 2017

VACANCY - POST OF REGIONAL ORGANISER FOR THE NORTH EAST AREA (BASED IN MANCHESTER), EQUITY

If anyone is interested in the below job, please contact Ian for further information and relevant job advert and attachments.

Ian Manborde

Equalities

Diversity Organiser, Equity

T: 020 7670 0273

M: 07595 201 640

Email: imanborde@EQUITY.ORG.UK

JOB CONTEXT FOR THE POST OF REGIONAL ORGANISER FOR THE NORTH EAST AREA (BASED IN MANCHESTER), EQUITY

 Equity

 

Equity is the UK trade union for professional performers and creative practitioners. As a leading industry organisation, Equity is known and respected nationally and internationally for the work we do with, and on behalf of, our members working across all areas of the entertainment industry.

 

We are a campaigning and organising union and proud of our strong record of taking the things that matter to our members to parliament and other centres of influence. Members are at the heart of all the union’s activities and by getting involved they drive forward the work of the union.

 

Equity works to support its 42,000+ members by negotiating their terms and conditions including fee structures with all kinds of employers and employer’s groups.

 

Background

 

The union has a team of staff in offices across the UK who have a wealth of experience and expertise when it comes to advice and representation. They are able to deal with the issues raised by members working in all areas of the industry whether it be a major feature film, a theatre in education show, radio voice overs, a circus act or any other live or recorded work.

 

The post of Regional Organiser for the North East Area works within a small team of highly skilled organisers dedicated to representing, protecting and promoting the interests of our members and plays a key role in organising, representing and supporting Equity members working in both live entertainment and recorded media in Yorkshire and the North East of England. As the current contract expires at the end of 2017, we are seeking to appoint from 2018 onwards.

 

We have Regional Organisers for the North East, North West, Midlands and South East Areas of the UK and National Organisers for Scotland & Northern Ireland, and Wales and the South West of England.  They are responsible for the monitoring and enforcing of collective agreements, leading negotiations with employers for revision of agreements and establishing new agreements. They manage a regional casework load and represent members in dispute with employers. Their day-to-day work includes responding to queries from members and giving advice on interpretation of agreements and enquiries arising from individual engagements. 

Equity, Guild House, Upper St Martin's Lane, London WC2H 9EG

www.equity.org.uk   

 

Find Equity on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/Equity/29887547393 & Twitter at twitter.com/EquityUK

 

20th November 2017

Reminder - CIPD Applied Research Conference 2017

There's still time to register for the CIPD Applied Research Conference, taking place this year in Glasgow, on 30 November and 1 December, 2017. 

The Applied Research Conference (ARC) is an annual meeting place for researchers and practitioners working in people management, employment policy and related fields. It is an interdisciplinary conference that covers a wide range of aspects of people management, employment, learning and development and organisational development.

Register now »

The conference starts on the evening of Thursday 30 November with practical workshops. The main programme on Friday 1 December centers on 35 research papers grouped into 15 thematic streams.


Don't miss out on hearing informative keynote presentations from:

  • Professor Kim Hoque and Dr Lisa Cameron MP on disability at work
  • Professor Eva Demerouti on work engagement and job crafting

Take a look at the full programme and booking information here.

ARC holds a unique place in strengthening links between academic research and HR practice. Join us to hear about cutting edge research, discuss how it can be applied in policy and practice, and network with like-minded researchers and practitioners.

We look forward to welcoming you to the event. Please feel free to forward this email on to any collaegues who you think may be interested in attending.

8th November 2017

Central London BUIRA Seminar: European Social Dialogue

Philippe Pochet (General Director, European Trade Union Institute) on What is the Role of Employers and what are the Hopes for the Future?

Werner Buelen (European Federation of Building and Woodworkers) on The Difficulties and Reality of the European Social Dialogue for Trade Unions

Discussant: Professor Richard Hyman (LSE)

 

Friday 24 November 201710.30am – 12.30pm, followed by buffet lunch

University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS

(opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)
Room 
C385 (lunch C287)

 

For further details and to reserve a place, contact Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk)

 

This regular monthly seminar is focused on European Social Dialogue (ESD), which celebrated its 30thanniversary in 2015, and we are extremely lucky that Philippe Pochet, has agreed to speak on this. Philippe is General Director of the ETUI and visiting lecturer at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) and the College of Europe, having previously been Director of the Observatoire social européen (OSE). The ESD remains one of the pillars of social Europe and an important element of European integration, though since the beginning of the millennium it has lost much of its momentum. His aim is to speak about the strategy of the different EU actors, in particular the employers’ organisations and European multinationals in the ESD, and to consider the ESD’s possible revival following the crises of European integration and threats to the internal market. Werner Buelen, Political Secretary Construction, from the European Federation of Building and Woodworkers will then follow with a critical account of the reality and results of the ESD.Richard Hyman, author with Rebecca Gumbrell McCormick of Trade Unions in Western Europe, has agreed to act as discussant.

 

The subject is highly topical in the light of the Brexit debate and the seminar provides an opportunity to air and discuss these issues in an open forum and consider their implications for industrial relations. Anyone interested is welcome to attend this event. These meetings can be full though so, if you would like to attend and to help forecast catering provision, please Contact: Professor Linda Clarke,  clarkel@wmin.ac.uk or020350 66528

7th November 2017

VACANCY – Senior Lecturer in International Human Resource Management

Newcastle University Business School – Senior Lecturer in International Human Resource Management

The vacancy closes on 29th November and is listed also on jobs.ac.uk: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BFJ051/senior-lecturer-in-international-human-resource-management-b94857a/

Applications are via the HR job vacancies website: https://vacancies.ncl.ac.uk/LoginV2.aspx

6th November 2017

A Symposium On Public Sector Pay And Workforce Issues: The End Of Austerity?

 

The University Of Greenwich Work And Employment Research Unit And Public Services International Research Unit Present

 

A Symposium On Public Sector Pay And Workforce Issues: The End Of Austerity?

 

Wednesday 29 november 2017. 13.00 – 18.00

 

Venue: Room HH102, Hamilton House, Park Vista, Greenwich, SE10 9LZ

 

This symposium brings together a range of speakers to discuss the current state of public sector pay and workforce issues.  We will look at what has happened to pay and the workforce in the public sector over the years of the Government pay policy, with up-to-date assessments from key participants in the debate. We have several speakers with different perspectives to help build the bigger picture. In recent months, the question of lifting the 1% cap on public sector pay has risen to the top of the political agenda. There are claims and counter claims about whether public or private sector workers are paid more and these claims will be tested.

 

Chair: Professor Sian Moore, University of Greenwich

 

Keynote speakers:

 

Ken Mulkearn, (Editor/author of Pay in the Public Services 2017, published by Incomes Data Research). Ken will cover recent pay outcomes and what they indicate for policy, where policy might be headed and the influences on this (labour markets, Government stance, unions, LP policy). He will also cover the key issues for policy-makers – comparability, pay progression, pay setting machinery, supply and inflation/catch-up.

 

Joshua Rawlings, (Economic Researcher, Office for National Statistics). Joshua’s presentation will cover information around the factors affecting earnings using ASHE. The presentation focuses in particular on the differences in public and private sector pay. It presents two statistical models which explore the relationship between mean hourly earnings excluding overtime and a range of independent variables, the estimates of which are based on the 2016 ASHE data and includes a control for the size of the organisation.

 

Other Speakers

 

David Powell, (Senior salary officer NEU (NUT section, following the merger with ATL)) will cover pay developments in schools, Academies and the STRB. The talk will set out the impact of public sector pay policy since 2010 on teachers in schools and academies.  The following issues will be covered: pay restraint; the breakup of the national teacher pay structure; the imposition of performance-related pay; and the consequences of these policy developments for teacher recruitment and retention.

 

Peter Gordon, (Head of terms and conditions of service, British Medical Association) will cover the junior doctors’ dispute and the role of the DDPRB. He will outline the BMA’s interactions with the DDRB (doctors’ pay review body), talk about the junior doctor contract dispute before finishing with a short section on negotiating during austerity.

 

Gerry O’Dwyer, (National Officer Royal College of Nursing). Pay developments for NHS staff. Gerry will highlight the issues in respect of the 2017/18 NHS pay round and the ‘claim’ made by unions to the Chancellor in advance of the submission of evidence to the NHS Pay Review Body. This will cover in particular the position of nurses and health care assistants and will highlight the issues that have caused them most concern during the period of austerity. He will also discuss the RCN’s successful  ‘Scrap the Cap campaign’, as well as the challenges that the RCN can face in considering industrial action.

 

Dave Penman, (General Secretary, First Division Association): Dave will consider the impact of pay policy on senior civil servants and the issues of recruitment and retention of skilled employees in the senior civil service.

 

A panel of experts will then discuss the issues raised

 

Nicola Allison, Remuneration Advisor, Office of Manpower Economics

Heather Wakefield, National Negotiations Officer for Local Government, Unison and Visiting Fellow, University of Greenwich

Professor Ian Kessler, Kings College London.

 

This is a free seminar open to the public and all are invited but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by registering your interest at:

 

 https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/a-symposium-on-public-sector-pay-and-workforce-the-end-of-austerity-tickets-39015529499?aff=es2 

 

How To Find Us

 

Hamilton House, 15 Park Vista, Greenwich, London SE10 9LZ

Telephone: +44 20 8331 9083 E-mail:i3centre@gre.ac.uk

3rd November 2017

Call for the next BUIRA stewardship 2019-2022

Since it was first established, BUIRA has been overseen by a team of stewards and an Executive Board. Currently the stewardship structure includes officers with responsibility for communications, membership, conference/events and financing. The tenure of each stewardship team is 3 years and the team is expected to host the BUIRA annual conference in the last year of tenure.

We are now open to proposals for a takeover of the stewardship after the 2019 annual conference held at Newcastle.  The tenure will be from 2019 – 2022 during which time will include the celebration the 70th anniversary of the establishment of BUIRA.  

Ideally, the stewards team will be co-located within the same institution, but proposals for teams made of individuals at different institutions will also be considered.

Proposals should include names of stewards for the following roles:

  • President
  • Treasurer
  • Membership officer
  • Communications officer
  • Conference and Events officer

Informal enquiries may be made to jo.mcbride@newcastle.ac.uk and ana.lopes@ncl.ac.uk

2nd November 2017

Call For Papers - BUIRA Conference 2018

Call for Papers

BUIRA Conference 2018

The return of politics to employment relations

Middlesex University, London Wednesday 27 to Friday 29 June 2018

 

Howell (2005) observes that the emergence of the “third system of industrial relations” in the UK – from 1979 - is one that, among the institutional issues, removed employment relations as a high profile political issue in public life.  While the Winter of Discontent made industrial relations the primary political national issue in the 1979 general election, by the time the Employment Relations Bill was being debated in 1998-9 it attracted low key media or even parliamentary attention.  If the neoliberal age has been one which has institutionally sidelined the notion of collective worker representation, it has also been one that has attempted to ideologically individualise the employment relationship into a market transactional one.

In 2017, the situation seems to have changed.  The underlying ideological predisposition that the employment relationship is a consensual voluntary market transaction is a lot less certain among a significant proportion of working people who instead see unfairness and futility.  In the UK, while unemployment is relatively low, ‘underemployment’ and the perceptions of insecurity, precarity, ‘bad jobs’ and inequality are high.  Similar tensions are reported across the developed world.  These changes could be partly the longer-term consequence of the global financial crisis of 2007/8, of global and national austerity or of the way in which globalisation has affected jobs in adjusting the global north to the global south. The politics surrounding the (un)fairness of the system governing work and employment are now acute and are beginning to challenge the assumptions underpinning key institutions governing the system as a whole. 

It is difficult to pin an exact location for this ‘disruption’ but its manifestations are evident.  While workplace collective bargaining remains dormant outside the shrunken domains of public sector and established large employers, the levels of discontent among the ‘unorganised’ are growing. This includes legal and small scale collective challenges to practices associated with the ‘gig economy’ (a prominent theme discussed at BUIRA 2017); and the return of industrial relations policy as a contested ideological agenda at national level politics (with Labour now championing trade union rights and the Conservative government seeming to need to address perceptions of unfairness with a more paternalist reform agenda on issues such as corporate governance and pay inequality.  The Conservatives’ apparent change of direction is of particular interest as it seems to mark an important symbolic break with the cornerstone principle of laissez-faire market individualism that has underpinned government policy since Thatcher in 1979.

Such re-politicisation of work and employment has not just been a UK phenomenon.  The Trump phenomenon in the US, with its rhetoric of protectionism and anti-immigration, has also arguably been based on a populist challenge to the prevailing neoliberal orthodoxy of open markets. .  In France the direction seems to be equal and opposite: the reforming Macron government seems intent on market-based reforms to labour laws more in line with the neoliberal agenda falling out of favour elsewhere.

Although we welcome papers that concern any area of industrial relations, theoretical contributions in relation to the changes we’re observing in the relationship between politics and employment are particularly welcome, as well as papers concerning topics under the following headings:

  • State regulation and unions
  • Individual employment rights and juridification
  • Migration and freedom of movement
  • Work and inequality
  • Corporate governance and worker voice
  • Regulating the gig economy

 

The call for papers is open until 30th January 2018.

Please use template provided below and submit abstract through the BUIRA website: https://www.buira.org/

If you would like to propose a stream or special session, please send a proposal to admin@buira.org by 20th December 2017.

 

BUIRA conference abstract template

Title:

Brief outline (100 words):

Methodology (150 words):

Key findings (250 words):

References:

2nd November 2017

Academy of Social Sciences | eBulletin October/November 2017

ACADEMY E-BULLETIN OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2017

 

For all news about the Academy and its Campaign visit www.acss.org.uk and campaignforsocialscience.org.uk

 ACADEMY NEWS

 

NEW FELLOWS

Earlier this month the Academy has conferred the award of Fellow on 69 leading social scientists. The new Fellows are drawn from academics, practitioners and policymakers across the social sciences. They have been recognised after an extensive peer review process for the excellence and impact of their work through the use of social science for public benefit. This includes substantial contributions and leadership in various fields, including higher education, social, economic and environmental policy, government, law, charitable foundations and think tanks.

Announcing the conferment, Professor Roger Goodman FAcSS, Chair of the Academy said, “Each new distinguished Fellow has been recognised for their outstanding and impactful contributions in their respective fields, and will prove invaluable additions to the range of expertise within the Academy. This speaks not only to the power and scope of the social sciences to address the big issues of our time, but also to the growing depth and breadth of representation within the Academy as the voice of the social science community as a whole.” More (including full list)

 

REF SUB-PANEL MEMBERSHIP APPLICATIONS

HEFCE has begun the work of recruiting people to serve as members of the Sub-Panels for the next REF exercise. The information is here and here.

Nomination is via subject associations. We are ready, as with the recruitment of chairs, to confirm Fellowship for individuals, giving the date of conferment and confirming that they remain in good standing with the Academy (which means that the individual has not resigned or lapsed their Fellowship and their subscription is up to date). Once you know you are being nominated, please write to Jordene Sewell to request this, noting which learned society is nominating you and for which Sub-Panel.

 

NEW ESRC HEAD

The Academy of Social Sciences congratulates Professor Jennifer Rubin of King’s College London on her appointment as Executive Chair of the Economic and Social Research Council.  The ESRC needs to be a strong voice for using a wide range of types of rigorous social science research and evidence in the new problem-driven funds of UKRI – for example in addressing industrial strategy and global challenges. It also needs to support a strong social science base of many different types of social science, including basic, descriptive and causal research across all disciplines. We are sure that under Professor Rubin’s leadership the ESRC will continue to recognise the importance of maintaining and extending the excellence of the strong social science base in the UK. We look forward to working with Professor Rubin both to promote the best use of social science evidence and to ensure support for existing strengths in UK social sciences, as well as their further development.

 

NOMINATIONS

The closing date for receipt of Fellowship nominations for the winter round is Friday 24th November. Guidelines and Forms are available from the Academy website.

 NEW WEBSITE

We are delighted to launch our new-look website, with improved functionality and stability. Do please take a look.

 

ACADEMY EVENTS

 

PRESIDENT’S LUNCH 2017 – Edinburgh, 14th December – NOW BOOKING

This year the lunch returns to the Royal Society of Edinburgh and will be held on Thursday 14th December 2017. We are delighted that John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister, will speak at the event. This is the annual highlight of the Academy’s calendar; an opportunity for Fellows, member learned societies and their guests to enjoy high level networking in elegant and congenial surroundings. Newly conferred Fellows may also be presented with their certificate by the President at the event. Learned Societies may take whole or part tables (tables will seat 8 people). Tickets are available here.

 

CfSS 5th ANNUAL SAGE PUBLISHING LECTURE 2017 – ‘EDUCATIONAL INEQUALITY IN A POPULIST ERA’ – 21st November

The Rt Hon Lord (David) Willetts FAcSS, former Minister of State (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) (Universities and Science), is confirmed as respondent for the lecture to be given on ‘Educational Inequality in a Populist Era’ by Professor Louise Richardson FAcSS, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford. The event will take place at 61 Whitehall, London SW1A 2ET, on the evening of Tuesday 21st November 2017. Fellows and Learned Societies should have received an email invitation with a link for booking places, which are free.

 

INTERNATIONAL AND MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON EVIDENCE-BASED POLICY (London 4th December)

Part of the seminar series organised by the Academy’s International Advisory Group. Seminar 4: ‘Historical and International Perspectives on Health’ will take place at 33 Finsbury Square, London EC2A 1AG on 4th December 2017. More

CAMPAIGN FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE NEWS

 

STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FORUM (SLF) EXAMINES ROLE OF SOCIAL SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY

The first meeting of the Campaign for Social Science’s newly convened Strategic Leadership Forum on 10 October considered how the social sciences could most effectively contribute to the emerging priorities of the government’s industrial strategy. Bringing together leaders from across academia, the public sector and industry, the SLF addressed two major themes: the role of the social sciences in solving the ‘productivity puzzle’, and how to make more effective use of social science expertise by forging new links across business and social enterprise.  The meeting included an excellent talk from Andy Haldane FAcSS, Chief Economist at the Bank of England, on the productivity challenges facing the UK. Participants agreed various means by which members of the Forum can help showcase the ways in which they are deeply engaged with the challenges of regional development and industrial strategy, and the global challenges set by UKRI.

The SLF is one of the benefits available to Silver and Gold level members of the CfSS Supporter Scheme. It brings together social science leaders to discuss key topics, foster learning and strengthen strategic relationships across the sector. It offers social science leaders a unique opportunity to engage with current and forthcoming policy issues and hear from colleagues in the sector, external decision makers, influencers and thought leaders. Its goal is to examine what the Campaign for Social Science can do to promote the prospects of social science, including research funding, and to work more closely with HEIs and Learned Societies to do so.

More information about joining the scheme is available by emailing the Campaign team.

 

“PATHWAYS TO IMPACT IN THE WELSH GOVERNMENT AND NATIONAL ASSEMBLY OF WALES” TOOLKIT

The Campaign for Social Science launched a new online tool-kit Pathways to impact: a practical guide for researchers, in collaboration with Cardiff University. The online tool-kit is designed to help new researchers improve their political impact by providing guidance to link social science evidence more closely to the policy making process, with a focus on the Welsh Government and National Assembly for Wales.

A series of straightforward recommendations outlines how to make sure research stands out and is most effectively put into action by civil servants, parliamentarians, and Ministers. There are four broad themes: understanding the political context and landscape; engagement and maximising impact; credibility and independence; overcoming obstacles. More

 

Policy Monitor for October– our monthly compendium of official consultations relevant to our community, is also available in an online searchable form on the Campaign website

 POLICY WORK

From our Head of Policy: Sharon Witherspoon MBE FAcSS

During October we have continued our engagement with the ESRC and UKRI over the longitudinal studies review, data access and industrial strategy.  We remain concerned that the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund needs to consider not only the social science elements of the current challenges identified so far under the industrial strategy, but also the ‘horizontal’ elements that might lead to strategic consideration of productivity and regional differences, including experiments that might explore how to improve productivity.

We held fruitful meetings with our Learned Society members at the end of September and again at the British Academy in early October about the work that they are already doing to engage with practitioners and professionals outside academic that might inform our engagement with the ESRC and UKRI.  We are preparing a template and plan to circulate that shortly. It is vital that we are able to demonstrate the existing work the social sciences are already undertaking to engage outside the academic community.

Meanwhile, we are continuing our work on pathways from school to university to employment, showing the various destinations of employment of social science graduates, and highlighting the importance of number and data skills.  We expect to have a draft report by the end of the year, with the aim of launching in February. Sage Publishing is partnering in this work.

We also note the publication today of the Final Report of the Industrial Strategy Commission, headed by Dame Kate Barker FAcSS.

CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL SCIENCE – the journal of the Academy of Social Sciences

 

Current Calls for Papers for themed issues:

OPPORTUNITIES

  • UKRI are now looking for Council members. More

 

FELLOWS NEWS AND BOOKS

LEARNED SOCIETY NEWS AND EVENTS

 

  • British Academy of Management (BAM)

o   CEO sought – deadline extended to 2 November. More

o   Event: Doctoral writing workshop (Joint LLD and OTCD SIG event). London 27 November

o   Event: Mid-career faculty – moving to the next level. Nottingham 30 November

o   International Journal of Management Reviews (IJMR) Special Issue – ‘Paradoxes’ - Call for Papers (deadline 1 November)

o   Association for Project Management (APM)

o   New publication: Road to Chartered series, No 6: ‘Professional Responsibilities and Obligations: the case of millennials’.

o   Research publication: The Importance of Conventions: a critical evaluation of current practice in social cost-benefit analysis

o   Project Assurance SIG Conference. ‘Project Assurance: what could it do for you?’ London, 23 November.

o   Festival of Social Science Event: ‘Putting social science into project management’. London, 9 November.

  • British Educational Research Association (BERA)

o   2017 BERA SAGE Public Engagement and Impact Award Winner announced

o   2018 BERA Doctoral Thesis and Masters Dissertation Awards – Now Open. (Deadline 12 January 2018)

  • Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

o   Event: Fulfilling the potential of your doctorate. London, 24 November

o   Event: Beds, bricks and HE (II) – trends and issues in student residential accommodation. London 24 November

o   Event: Preventing plagiarism. London 24 January 2018

o   Measuring Employability Gain. London 21 November 2017.

o   SRHE International Research Conference 2017 – ‘Higher Education rising to the challenge: Balancing expectations of students, society and stakeholders’ Newport, Wales, 6-8 December 2017.

o   SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference, Newport Wales, 5 December 2017

  • Society for the Advancement of Management Studies (SAMS)

o   Professional Development Workshop, 20 April 2018, USA

o   Journal of Management Studies Conference 2018. Babson College USA, 18-20 April 2018 – call for papers now open.

  • British Accounting and Finance Association (BAFA)

o   Annual Conference 2018 with doctoral masterclasses. London, 10-11 April 2018.

  • British Sociological Association (BSA)

o   BSA Philip Abrams Memorial Prize 2018 – Call for Nominations (1st December 2017)

o   Postgraduate Forum Regional Day Event proposals 2018.

o   Work, Employment and Society - Call for Papers – Solidarities in and through Work in an Age of Extremes (1 December 2017)

  • British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE)

o   Biennial Conference: ‘Comparative Education and Development Alternatives: Critiques, Innovations and Transitions’. York, 12-14 September 2018. 

o   Seed corn and Research Capacity Building Funding Opportunities (Deadline 1 May 2018)

o   BAICE Thematic Forum Grants (Deadline 1 May 2018)

  • British Society of Criminology (BSC)

o   Innovation Fund Grants now available.

  • Political Studies Association (PSA)

o   Total Exposure. The PSA is inviting academics to pitch TV or radio programmes based on their research to top broadcasters (deadline 31 October)

o   Free one-day EU workshop for teachers London, 25 November.

  • Society for Studies in Organizing Healthcare (SHOC)

o   Biennial Conference: Co-ordinating healthcare across boundaries and borders. Montreal, May 2018. More

  • British Society of Gerontology (BSG)

o   47th Annual British Society of Gerontology Conference, Manchester, United Kingdom, 4–6 July 2018

  • Association for Social Anthropology (ASA)

o   Conference: Shifting States. Australia 15-18 December 2017

  • Association for Psychosocial Studies (APS)

o   Biennial conference: Psychosocial Reflections on a Half Century of Cultural Revolution. Bournemouth 5-7 April 2018.

  • Regional Studies Association (RSA)

o   PhD Student and early career conference 2017: ‘Charting a career path – sharing the learning and lessons. Newcastle 2-3 November.

  • Association for Tourism in HE (ATHE)

o   Annual Conference - New Approaches to Tourism Learning in Higher Education. 7-8 December 2017. Eastbourne, 7-8 December 2017.

  • Social Research Association (SRA)

o   Annual Conference 2017: ‘Social Research in a Sceptical Age’. London 6 December 2017.

o   o    Annual Conference 2018. Keele, 6-8 April 2018.

SOCIAL SCIENCE SPACE

Some recent postings on socialsciencespace.com

 

Social Science bites podcast:

Tom Chatfield on Critical Thinking and Bias

Philosopher Tom Chatfield’s media presence – which is substantial – is often directly linked to his writings on technology. But his new book is on critical thinking, and while that involves humanity’s oldest computer, the brain, Chatfield explains in this Social Science Bites podcast that new digital realities interact with old human biases. As Chatfield tells interviewer Dave Edmonds, while he defines bias as “an inaccurate account of the way things actually are,” this like confirmation, affect and recency bias aren’t automatically toxic to critical thinking.

2nd November 2017

Special issue of the living Wage in the journal Employee Relations

The special issue of Employee Relations `Low pay and the living wage – an international perspective` is available in volume 39, No.6, 2017 is now in print. It examines the development of living wage issues and policies. The contributors examine the differences in UK national minimum wage (NMW) and the `real` living wage, how the `real` living wage is calculated in the UK, new institution influencing the living wage debate, UK trade union perspectives from the Trades Union Congress (TUC), small to medium sized enterprises adopting the `living wage, comparing union and communities campaigning and also local government living wage campaigns.

The second section deals with international agendas on the living wage with contributors from Denmark, USA, South East Asia and New Zealand.

This special issue will be open access and free Employee Relations Special issue on Low Pay and the Living Wage Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017) and it is all open access on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/er/39/6

The Editorial is on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-08-2017-0185

Contributors include William Brown http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-04-2017-0072

Paul Sellers (TUC) on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-04-2017-0095

Ed Heery and Colleague on Living wage campaigns http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-04-2017-0083

Donald Hirsch on calculating living wage on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-03-2017-0048

Prowse and colleagues on Living Wage campaigning on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-03-2017-0053

Matt Johnson on implementing the Living wage on local government on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-02-2017-0039

Werner and Lim on implementation of LW in retail on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-07-2017-0150

International perspectives include USA on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-07-2017-0153

New Zealand on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-03-2017-0071

Denmark on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-03-2017-0049

South East Asian ethical trade on http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/ER-02-2017-0046

1st November 2017

Challenges in Equality and Diversity in 2017

The University of Greenwich is proud to announce the launch of its university-wide Diversity Interest Group. Our key-note speakers are: 

Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon OBE
Professor Kim Hoque

The launch event will take place on Thursday 2nd November in QA063 at 6pm-8pm.

Join us for an evening of key-note speeches, Q&A, poster displays, canapes and wine!

To register, please email BusinessEvents@gre.ac.uk

30th October 2017

Lecturership in HRM, Birkbeck College, University of London

Lecturership in HRM, Birkbeck College, University of London

This post, for which the closing date is 15 November 2017, is advertised as being in HRM, so many readers of this bulletin may not consider it at first glance, but in the particulars it is also stated the main field for applicants should be either HRM or ER/IR. My colleague John Kelly and I would very much encourage potential applicants whose main field is employment/industrial relations to apply, to join our little team of ER/IR specialists in the Department of Management at Birkbeck. This is an open-ended position at the level of lecturer with an initial three-year probation. Those interested should contact: Professor John Kelly, Professor in Management (j.kelly@bbk.ac.uk) or Dr Rebecca Gumbrell-McCormick, Senior Lecturer in Management (r.gumbrell-mccormick@bbk.ac.uk).

A link to the posting can be found at:
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BEY041/lectureship-in-human-resource-management/.

or

http://jobs.bbk.ac.uk/fe/tpl_birkbeckcollege01.asp?s=4A515F4E5A565B1A&jobid=65206,3212825623&key=117050816&c=22793402343425&pagestamp=secxweisdtxwxoezri

23rd October 2017

Extraordinary Times in Politics and Society

Manchester Industrial Relations Society

Extraordinary Times in Politics and Society

Speaker: Andy Beckett, Guardianjournalist, author of When the Lights Went Out: Britain in the Seventies (2009) and Promised You a Miracle: Why 1980–82 Made Modern Britain (2015).

http://www.mirs.org.uk/index.html

Thursday 16 November 6pm
Lecture Theatre G33, Ground Floor
Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
All Saints, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BH
Map:  http://www.mmu.ac.uk/travel/allsaints/

 

Britain is living through a period of upheaval in in its party politics, economy, and everyday life, at a pace and on a scale not experienced since the infamous long crisis from the mid-70s to the early 80s. Andy Beckett, an acclaimed historian of those years, and a Guardian political journalist with a roving brief since 1997, will talk about the loss of faith in the Conservative party and the free-market ideas that have sustained it for 40 years; why this is happening now, and whether the Conservatives can reverse it; and about the opportunities this time of flux may be opening up for the Labour party and the wider British left.

 

For further details of the Manchester Industrial Relations Society please  contact:

 

Professor Ralph Darlington, Salford Business School, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT

Phone: 0161-295-5456; email: r.r.darlington@salford.ac.uk

Manchester Industrial Relations Society website:www.mirs.org.uk

Twitter: @ManchesterIRS

20th October 2017

Jobs in HR/ER at Warwick

The Organisation and HRM group at the University of Warwick are currently recruiting in the area of HRM/Employment Relations. Links to the adverts are as follows:

Assistant Professor in Human Resource Management (80254-107)
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BEZ739/assistant-professor-in-human-resource-management-80254-107/

 

Associate Professor in Human Resource Management (80254-107)
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BEZ679/associate-professor-in-human-resource-management-80254-107/

 Potential applicants can contact Head of the OHRM Group, Kim Hoque (kim.hoque@wbs.ac.uk) for a confidential discussion. 

19th October 2017

Available Position in Labour Relations - Memorial University of Newfoundland

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND

St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

FACULTY OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

(AACSB International Accredited)

Labour Relations

Competition Number: VPA-BUSI-2016-001

Applications are invited for a tenure-track faculty position in Labour Relations at the rank of assistant professor with a proposed commencement date of July 1, 2018. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. The position is subject to budgetary approval.

The successful candidate will have a demonstrated record of scholarly output in Labour/Industrial Relations, and be able to teach in undergraduate and graduate (MBA, Master of Employment Relations) programs, and support the faculty’s M.Sc. and PhD specializations. The ability to also teach undergraduate and graduate courses in Human Resource Management (HRM) or a track record of HRM research would be an asset.

Applicants should have a PhD in Labour/Industrial Relations or a related field, and a demonstrated commitment to teaching and research in a university environment. Applicants must have demonstrated research productivity commensurate with the rank of assistant professor. If a successful candidate has not completed an earned doctorate, he/she shall be appointed to a regular term, non-renewable three-year appointment at the rank of assistant professor. If the candidate completes all the requirements for the doctorate during the first 24 months of the term appointment, he/she shall begin a tenure-track appointment following completion of the requirements of the degree.

The Faculty of Business Administration is a leader in management education and is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Approximately 1,300 students are registered in the undergraduate programs of the Faculty, with another 200 students completing graduate programs, including a PhD and M.Sc. in Management. For additional information about our Faculty, please visit our web site at www.business.mun.ca.

Memorial University is Newfoundland and Labrador’s only university, and plays an integral role in the educational and cultural life of the province. Offering diverse undergraduate and graduate programs to over 18,000 students, Memorial provides a distinctive and stimulating environment for learning. St. John’s is a safe, friendly city with great historic charm, a vibrant cultural life, and easy access to a wide range of outdoor activities. For further information about Memorial, please visit www.mun.ca.

The deadline to receive applications is January 31, 2018. Applications should include a curriculum vita, a cover letter, names and addresses of three references, statement of teaching interests, and statement of research interests, and three selected recent research publications (and/or working papers if the candidate does not have three publications). Please send applications electronically to:

Dr. Isabelle Dostaler, Dean

Faculty of Business Administration

Memorial University of Newfoundland

St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada, A1B 3X5

E-mail: deanfba@mun.ca

REFERENCE: VPA-BUSI-2016-001

For further information telephone (709) 864-8851 or fax (709) 864-2467 or e-mail deanfba@mun.ca.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. Memorial University is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from qualified women and men, visible minorities, Aboriginal people and persons with disabilities.

18th October 2017

Events: Central London BUIRA in Conjunction with the University of Westminster

BRITISH UNIVERSITIES INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS ASSOCIATION

Central London BUIRA in conjunction with

THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTMINSTER

 

The Central London branch of BUIRA meets in the Westminster Business School of the University of Westminster at 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (nearest tube Baker Street). There are many with an interest in industrial relations in the London area, including from universities, trade unions and employer associations. The meetings take the form of seminars, with key speakers, and attract a lively mix of people, both BUIRA and non-BUIRA members, from a range of different disciplines and organisations, some very expert in the particular topic discussed. We usually meet on the last Friday of the month at 10.30, with coffee available from 10.15 and a sandwich lunch provided from 12.30. This gives ample opportunity to discuss the presentation from an invited speaker and matters of common interest, as well as just to catch up with friends. The programme aims to give us fresh insights into key current issues, to present new approaches to the subject of industrial relations, and to discuss important research in the area - whether in Britain or farther afield, particularly on mainland Europe. The programme for 2017-18 is about the changing nature of social partnership and the labour contract at national, transnational and global level.

 

24th November 2017European Social Dialogue, with Philippe Pochet (General Director, European Trade Union Institute) on What is the Role of Employers and what are the Hopes for the Future? and tbcDiscussant: Richard Hyman (LSE)

Room C385 (lunch C287)

 

26th January 2018The changing labour contract, with Dr Simon Joyce (University of Leeds) on the Future of Work and the Gig Economy and Dr Alexandra Oeser (Université Paris Nanterre) From local to international: wiping out the employer?

Discussant: Rebecca Gumbrell-McCormick (Birkbeck College)

Room CG44

 

23rd February 2018, Labour Abuse, with Professor Roberto Pedersini (University of Milan) on Coping with fraudulent Work in the European Union, and Nick Clark (Middlesex University) on One law for the rich… Case studies from the Unpaid Britain project

Room: CG44

 

27th April 2018 Labour Migration with Professor Bridget Anderson (University of Bristol) on and Dr Rachel Marangozov (Institute of Employment Studies) on Migration of NursesRoom C279 (lunch C287)

 

25th May 2018, tbc

Room: C279 (lunch C287)

 

So do put these dates in your diary now. These meetings can be full. To ensure a place and to help forecast catering provision, please Contact: Prof. Linda Clarke, Westminster Business School, University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS. Tel. 020350 66528; email: clarkel@wmin.ac.uk(please also let me know if you subsequently need to cancel)

17th October 2017

Event: Unpaid Britain Project Report Launch

Following the publication in June of Unpaid Britain’s interim report on unpaid wages, the project’s final report will be launched on 30th November from 9am to 1pm at an event at Conway Hall in Central London.

Key elements of this report will be presented, showing the extent of non-payment, strategies deployed by some employers to withhold wages, the cost to unpaid workers and to the state, and evaluation of the means available for recovering unpaid sums. An audience of workers, union representatives, employers, NGOs, regulators, policy makers and academics will be invited to consider and respond to a range of recommendations aimed at combating unpaid wages. They will hear keynote addresses from the newly-appointed Director of Labour Market Enforcement (Sir David Metcalf) and a leading trade unionist, and testimony from some of those directly involved in cases.

If you wish to attend the event please register using Eventbrite, if you have any questions please don’t hesitate contacting Eva Herman on e.herman@mdx.ac.uk

12th October 2017

Book Launch Event: The Marketization of Employment Services. Dilemmas of Europe’s Work-First Welfare States

Dear colleagues,

 

Former Work and Employment Research Unit (WERU) director Ian Greer will be launching a new book based on a research project into services for the unemployed at the University of Greenwich on 17th November 2017.

 

"The Marketization of Employment Services. Dilemmas of Europe's Work-First Welfare States" includes contributions from WERU members Lisa Schulte and Graham Symon, and is coauthored Karen Breidal and Flemming Larsen from Aalborg University and Matthias Knuth from the Institut fuer Arbeit und Qualifikation in Duisburg. The research was funded by the Hans Boeckler Stiftung and the publisher is Oxford University Press.

 

The event will run from 4- 7 PM in Queen Anne Court, Room 063, in the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, with food and drinks after the discussion. Commentators will be Chiara Benassi (King’s College London), John McInally (the Public and Commercial Services Union), and Matt Vidal (University of Loughborough).  Below, a description of the book.

 

To confirm attendance, please contact BusinessEvents@greenwich.ac.uk.

 

Best wishes,

 

Prof Sian Moore

Director of the Work and Employment Research Group (WERU)

 

The Marketization of Employment Services. Dilemmas of Europe’s Work-First Welfare States

Ian Greer, Karen Breidahl, Matthias Knuth, and Flemming Larsen

Oxford University Press, 2017

 

Across Europe, market mechanisms are spreading into areas where they did not exist before. In public administration, market governance is displacing other ways of coordinating public services. In social policy, the welfare state is retreating from its historic task of protecting citizens from the discipline of the market. In industrial relations, labor and management are negotiating with an eye to competitiveness, often against new non-union market players.

 

What is marketization, and what are its effects? This book uses employment services in Denmark, Germany, and Great Britain as a window to explore the rise of market mechanisms. Based on more than 100 interviews with funders, managers, front-line workers, and others, the authors discuss the internal workings of these markets and the organizations that provide the services.

 

This book gives readers new tools to analyse market competition and its effects. It provides a new conceptualization of the markets themselves, the dilemmas and tradeoffs that they generate, and the differing services and workplaces that result. It is aimed at students and researchers in the applied fields of social policy, public administration, and employment relations and has important implications for comparative political economy and welfare states.

12th October 2017

5th BUIRA PhD Symposium: Call for Papers

5th BUIRA PhD Symposium: Call for Papers
The British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) invites you to take part in the 2017 BUIRA PhD Symposium, to be held at Cardiff University from Thursday the 30th of November to Friday the 1st of December.  
This year’s Symposium invites PhD students at any stage of their research to deliver a talk to their fellow delegates. The event provides an opportunity to deliver an academic presentation in a supportive and collaborative atmosphere to a smaller audience than the average conference, making it a particularly valuable occasion for earlier year PhD researchers to gain valuable experience presenting, and to receive constructive feedback from fellow PhD students and senior academics.
Empirical (both quantitative and qualitative), analytical, conceptual and methodological papers are all welcome. The frontiers of industrial relations as a field of study continue to expand, providing crucial insights into work, employment, and employment relations in twenty-first century societies, and we look forward to receiving submissions that reflect this. If you do wish to present, please submit an abstract of up to 250 words to buiraphd@outlook.com by Friday the 20th of October.
We look forward to seeing you in Cardiff!
Best wishes,
 
Calum Carson
Maisie Aufderhorst-Roberts
BUIRA PhD Network Facilitators 

12th October 2017

Event: Challenges in Equality and Diversity in 2017

Challenges in Equality and Diversity in 2017

The University of Greenwich is proud to announce the launch of its university-wide Diversity Interest Group.

Our key-note speakers are:

Baroness Lawrence of Clarendon OBE

Professor Kim Hoque

The launch event will take place on Thursday 2nd November in QA063 at 6pm-8pm.

Join us for an evening of key-note speeches, Q&A, poster displays, canapes and wine!

To register, please email BusinessEvents@gre.ac.uk

12th October 2017

CIPD Applied Research Conference 2017

CIPD Applied Research Conference 2017

Thursday 30th November – Friday 1st December 2017

University of Strathclyde Business School, Glasgow.

 

Join us at the CIPD Applied Research Conference 2017!

 

The Applied Research Conference (ARC) is an annual meeting place for researchers and practitioners working in people management, employment policy and related fields. It is an interdisciplinary conference that covers a wide range of aspects of people management, employment, learning and development and organisational development. In all research papers presented, we set out to discuss the practical application of insights to organisational life and labour markets.

 

This year, ARC is hosted in Glasgow by University of Strathclyde Business School, named Business School of the Year 2016 in the Times Higher Education Awards.

 

The conference starts on the evening of Thurs 30 November with practical workshops. The main programme on Friday 1 December centres on 35 research papers grouped into 15 thematic streams. We are also delighted to welcome keynote presentations from Professor Kim Hoque and Dr Lisa Cameron MP talking on disability at work, and Professor Eva Demerouti on work engagement and job crafting.

 

ARC holds a unique place in strengthening links between academic research and HR practice. Join us to hear about cutting edge research, discuss how it can be applied in policy and practice, and network with like-minded researchers and practitioners.

 

The full programme and booking information is available at http://www.cipd.co.uk/arc

11th October 2017

‘HRM: Tensions, Limits and (Potential) Demise’ – Manchester Industrial Relations Society Meeting

Manchester Industrial Relations Society

Arthur Priest Memorial Lecture/Joint Meeting with Manchester CIPD

HRM: Tensions, Limits and (Potential) Demise

Speaker: Professor Tony Dundon

Professor of Human Resource Management, Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester

Co-author of Understanding Employment Relations (2011), Handbook of Research on Employee Voice (2014) and A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Employment Relations (2017)

http://www.mirs.org.uk/index.html

Thursday 19 October 6pm-7.30pm
Lecture Theatre LT33, Ground Floor
Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
All Saints, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BH
Map:  http://www.mmu.ac.uk/travel/allsaints/

 

This presentation will review a longstanding tension in human resource management concerning the extent to which HRM can both support workers while at the same time representing (and defending) the interests of employers. Contemporary developments in hyper-marketization and ideological individualism will suggest that HR policy and practice have advanced an exclusive pro-market rather than inclusive pro-business agenda, to the neglect of broader organisational and societal concerns. As a result, the role of HRM - both an area of professional practice and an academic discipline - is at risk of impoverishment. Implications for the future of the subject area and the way HRM is taught in mainstream business schools will be considered.

For further details of the Manchester Industrial Relations Society please  contact:

 

Professor Ralph Darlington, Salford Business School, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT

Phone: 0161-295-5456; email: r.r.darlington@salford.ac.uk

Manchester Industrial Relations Society website:www.mirs.org.uk

Twitter: @ManchesterIRS

7th October 2017

Invitation to The University of Manchester's Work and Equalities Institute (WEI) Research Seminar

Invitation to The University of Manchester's Work and Equalities Institute (WEI) Research Seminar

 

Following the soft launch of the Work and Equalities Institute at the University of Manchester, we kick off our Research Seminar Series with a talk jointly organised with Salford Business School.

 

Sally Brett, Head of Equalities at the British Medical Association will deliver the talk "Women in the Workplace: the difference a generation makes". The talk reflects on the progress that has been made on gender equality in organisations over the past generation and considers the ongoing challenges facing women in the labour market. This talk is aimed at anyone interested in debates around gender equality in organisations, the gender pay gap, women’s career progression and specific challenges for women in medicine.

 

Date: Wednesday 11th October 2017

Time: 18:00 - 20:00 Hrs

Venue: University of Salford, MediaCityUK DPL, Room 0:11, MediaCityUK, Salford Quays, Salford M50 2HE

Registration via Eventbrite:http://bit.ly/2jFbNah (This event is FREEand requires registration for catering purposes).

 

Following the talk, there will be a drinks reception and networking opportunity.

6th October 2017

Book available via open access: Making work more equal: A new labour market segmentation approach

Book available via open access: Grimshaw, D., Fagan, C., Hebson, G. & Tavora, I. (Eds) (2017) Making work more equal: A new labour market segmentation approach, Manchester: Manchester University Press.

 

You can access the whole book here:http://www.oapen.org/search?identifier=634747

 

This book was  launched at the 38th International Working Party on Labour Market Segmentation (IWPLMS) Conference, which took place in Manchester last month. The first day of the conference was dedicated to Jill Rubery (she, alongside others, founded the conference in the late 1970s) and the book celebrates her work and its influence on the work of other scholars.

 

Feel free to share the link with others whom you think may be interested.

6th October 2017

The new issue of Historical Studies in Industrial Relations - no. 38 (2017) will be published shortly.

The new issue of Historical Studies in Industrial Relations - no. 38 (2017) will be published shortly.

 

 

Contents

 

Jean Jenkins                   Hands No Longer Wanted: Closure and the Moral Economy of Protest, Treorchy, South Wales 

Paul Smith                      The Law behind the Law: Rookes v. Barnard [1964], the Common Law and the Right to Strike 

Document                       The Trade Disputes Act 1965 

Otto Kahn Freund           Rookes v. Barnard — and After (1964) 

Charles McGuire              Going for the Jugular’: The Steelworkers’ Banner and the 1980 national steelworkers’ strike in Britain

Michael Gold                   ‘A Clear and Honest Understanding’: Alan Fox and the Origins and Implications of Radical Pluralism  

William Brown                 Introduction to Alan Fox, ‘Corporatism and Industrial Democracy’ 

Alan Fox                         Corporatism and Industrial Democracy: The Social Origins of Present Forms and Methods in Britain and Germany (1977) 

Dave Lyddon                   Writing Trade Union History: The Case of the National Union of Public Employees

Book Reviews

David Howell                   Emmet O’Connor, Big Jim Larkin Hero or Wrecker?

Andrew Perchard         Lewis H. Mates, The Great Labour Unrest: Rank-and-File Movements and Political Change in the Durham Coalfield (Manchester University Press: 2016)

John Eldridge                  John Macnicol, Neoliberalising Old Age

Chris Howell                    Steve Williams and Peter Scott (eds), Employment Relations under Coalition Government: The UK Experience, 2010–15

28th September 2017

NON-STANDARD EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS: DO THE TAYLOR REVIEW SOLUTIONS MEET THE CHALLENGES?

WORK AND EMPLOYMENT RESEARCH UNIT SEMINAR SERIES 2017-18
 
NON-STANDARD EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS: DO THE TAYLOR REVIEW SOLUTIONS MEET THE CHALLENGES?
 
WEDNESDAY 11 OCTOBER 2017. 15.00 – 18.00
 
VENUE: ROOM HH102, HAMILTON HOUSE, PARK VISTA, GREENWICH, SE10 9LZ
 
This seminar, the first of our series for 2017-18, considers the rise of non-standard forms of employment contract (the so-called ‘gig economy’), the impact for workers and the solutions proposed by the recent Taylor Review (July 2017). We have four presentations from those who have conducted recent work on non-standard working and the legal issues to provide the context for a debate on the recommendations of the Taylor Review. Our speakers include Dr Ewan McGaughey (Kings College London), Andrea Broughton (Institute of Employment Studies), Gill Dix (Acas) and Professor Sian Moore (University of Greenwich).  
 
Ewan McGaughey (Kings College London) will consider the recommendations of the Taylor Review (July 2017) and whether this was a squandered opportunity to address the problems of employment rights and tax evasion in today’s economy. He will consider the four main groups of Taylor’s recommendations. He will explain why relabelling employment statuses, more secondary legislation, cutting holiday pay, and ‘softening’ labour rights will solve little. He will also explain why a test for employment status highlighted by Taylor - ‘mutuality of obligation’ - has not formed part of binding UK Supreme Court jurisprudence since Autoclenz Ltd v Belcher. He will then discuss what the Taylor Review did not: gig economy fraud, and ensuring corporations do not evade rights and tax. Dr Ewan McGaughey joined King’s College as a lecturer in private law in 2014. He holds degrees from King’s, the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin and the London School of Economics, and has taught at UCL. He is also a research associate at the University of Cambridge Centre for Business Research. He was a Visiting Scholar at University of California, Berkeley from July to September 2016. He has appeared on Al Jazeera English, and French Parliament television (LCP Assemblée Nationale at 14:00), and speaks German reasonably well. 

 

Andrea Broughton (IES) will discuss her research in five sectors where atypical working is common - taxi/transport, professional/creative/high-skilled work, office/short online tasks/administration, physical low-skilled work and physical skilled work. Andrea Broughton is a Principal Research Fellow at the Institute for Employment Studies (IES), where she has worked since 2006. She has a degree in modern languages and a Masters in international industrial relations and human resource management. She has more than 20 years of experience of research and writing in the areas of employment relations, working conditions and industrial relations, specialising in international comparative research. She is interested in a range of labour market issues and has recently been focusing on atypical ways of working. She recently carried out a research project on precarious work for the European Parliament.

 

Gill Dix (Head of Strategy, Acas) will discuss policy work by Acas on tackling the abuse of atypical working contracts, based on queries received by the telephone advisory service. Gill Dix has a background in public policy and social research working in the voluntary and public sectors and academia. She was Head of Research at Acas for 15 years before becoming Head of Strategy. She has particular interests in workplace conflict, voice and participation as well as wider questions relating to decision making in public services. Gill has authored many research reports, papers and book chapters and is an active contributor to the prestigious Workplace Employment Relations Survey series.

 

Sian Moore (University of Greenwich) will explore the experiences of workers on non-standard contracts in the context of the Taylor Review, based on her recent research. Good Work: The Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices celebrates the ‘largely successful’ ‘British Way’, characterised by the UK’s flexible labour market. While driven by concerns about worker exploitation and vulnerability, flexibility is also seen to complement individual lifestyle and preference and there is an assumption that the demographics of the labour market define choice and job characteristics. The report advocates ‘good quality’ work, but that this will be achieved through an essentially voluntarist approach. Sian Moore is Professor of Employment Relations and Human Resource Management and Director of the Work and Employment Research Unit (WERU) at the University of Greenwich. Her research centres on the relationship between gender and class, consciousness and activism. Her current research focus is work and employment in the logistics sector and on the pay and conditions of homecare workers.

 

This is an open free seminar and all are invited but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by contacting Professor Geoff White on wg08@gre.ac.uk.
 
HOW TO FIND US

Hamilton House, 15 Park Vista, Greenwich, London SE10 9LZ
Telephone: +44 20 8331 9083 E-mail: i3centre@gre.ac.uk
 ​

 

28th September 2017

Job vacancy at the University of Sheffield

Job vacancy at the University of Sheffield
 
The University of Sheffield has advertised a Lectureship in Employment Relations. Further information is available at:

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/enhanced/linking/university-of-sheffield/management-school/
 
The closing date is 5th October.
 

28th September 2017

36th INTERNATIONAL LABOUR PROCESS CONFERENCE

36th INTERNATIONAL LABOUR PROCESS CONFERENCE

 

Buenos Aires, 21-23 March, 2018

 

 

Call for submission of abstracts and symposium proposals

 

Deadline: 31st October through the Conference website: www.ilpc.org.uk

 

ILPC focuses on three moments of labour within the broader political economy: labour processes, labour markets and labour organizing.

The special theme of the 2018 event will be Class and the Labour Process.

 

Conference streams

 

1- The changing time and space of productive and reproductive processes (Sachetto, Alberti and Lisdero)

 

2- The hidden places of Production (Briken, Garvey, Stewart, Portes Virginio, Mitidiero Junior, Mies Bombardi, Mac Ionnrachtaigh, Avila Romero and Concheiro Bórquez)

 

3- Breaking boundaries and opening new struggles (Hammer, Fishwick and Chambers)

 

4- Artificial Intelligence (Grigera and Woodcock)

 

5- Precarious Work in Comparative Perspective (Kalleberg and Vallas)

 

6- Human Resource Practice in Labour Process and Workplace (Vincent, Bamber, Delbridge, Doellgast, Grady and Grugulis)

 

 

 

Keynote speakers

 

Prof. David Harvey (CUNY)

 

Prof. Leo Panitch (York university)

 

Prof. Sergio Leite Lopes (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro)

 

Prof. Cinzia Arruzza (The New School)

 

 

 

For more information please check the Conference website (www.ilpc.org.uk) or email us at ilpc2018@gmail.com

 

 

22nd September 2017

University of Manchester Work and Equalities Institute Research Seminars

University of Manchester

Work and Equalities Institute

Research Seminars

2017-2018 – Semester 1

 

 

Women in the Workplace: the difference a generation makes

Sally Brett, British Medical Association

Wednesday 11th October 2017

18:00 - 20:00 Hrs

University of Salford, MediaCityUK DPL, Room 0:11
MediaCityUK, Salford Quays, Salford M50 2HE

Registration via Eventbrite: http://bit.ly/2jFbNah

 

Abstract

The talk reflects on the progress that has been made on gender equality in organisations over the past generation and considers the ongoing challenges facing women in the labour market. This talk is aimed at anyone interested in debates around gender equality in organisations, the gender pay gap, women’s career progression and specific challenges for women in medicine. Following the talk, there will be a drinks reception and networking opportunity.

 

About the Speaker

Sally Brett is the Head of Equalities at the British Medical Association. Previously, she was Senior Policy Officer in the TUC’s Economic and Social Affairs Department, covering individual employment rights. She is also a trustee and co-chair of the charity Working Families, which campaigns on behalf of working parents and carers.

 

 

Honoured in the breach: unpaid wages as a business model

Nick Clark, Middlesex University Business School

Wednesday 18th October 2017

15:30 - 17:00 Hrs (coffee and tea at 15:15)

AMBS Precinct Room 1.1, Crawford House, University of Manchester

 

Abstract

The seminar will present some of the results of a two-year investigation into unpaid wages (the Unpaid Britain project). The various research methods used will be described, including the use of several novel data sources, and what they have revealed about the abuse of workers’ rights in certain sectors, as well as the use of litigation strategies and the abuse of limited liability by some employers. Enforcement (or otherwise) by workers, their unions and the state will be examined and evaluated, as will the extent of non- or under-payment. Evidence will suggest that the recent attention focussed on the “gig economy” may be a distraction from more fundamental failings in the labour market. Future research, policy development and pedagogy arising from the research will also be discussed.

 

About the Speaker

Currently leading a two year project examining unpaid wages in Britain (with a particular focus on the London labour market) Nick Clark’s background is in practice. He held several trade union research and policy posts over 26 years before joining the Working Lives Research Institute in 2009, moving on to Middlesex University in 2015. His academic research has built on practical knowledge of wage bargaining, labour markets, migrant workers and employment rights, using mixed methods of documentary and legal case research, primary and secondary data analysis, and interview. He is an experienced user of the ASHE, LFS and Family Resource Survey datasets. Lately, his work focuses on various groups of workers’ lived experience of the employment contract, as distinct from its form, and on employer strategies for increasing the rate of exploitation. Other recent work has included studies of EU migration to the UK for the Friederich Ebert Foundation, approaches to combatting forced labour for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, and labour market intermediaries and trafficking for labour exploitation for EuroFound. He was a member of the Gangmasters Licensing Authority Board for the first four years of the GLA’s existence.  

 

 

Work, health and stress: some observations

Professor Tarani Chandola, University of Manchester

Wednesday 8th November 2017

15:30 - 17:00 Hrs (coffee and tea at 15:15)

AMBS Precinct Room 1.1, Crawford House, University of Manchester

 

Abstract

The talk will feature some recent studies on work, health and stress, examining whether “any job is better than no job” when it comes to health and wellbeing outcomes. The importance of good quality work and advantaged labour market conditions for health and wellbeing will be highlighted. It will also feature some examples of what could be done to reduce stress in the workplace.

 

About the Speaker

Tarani is a Professor of Medical Sociology. He joined the University of Manchester and the Cathie Marsh Institute in April 2010, was the head of the Disciplinary Area of Social Statistics (2012-2014) and the director of the Cathie Marsh Institute (2013-2016). He was formerly at the UCL Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, and prior to that completed his PhD and post-doc at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. He is a co-director of two ESRC centres: the National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM: www.ncrm.ac.uk) and the International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society and Health (ICLS: www.ucl.ac.uk/icls). Tarani’s research is primarily on the social determinants of health, focusing on health inequalities and psychosocial factors, and the analysis of longitudinal cohort studies. Much of his research is on stress at work, and its effects on health and related biomarkers. He leads the academic network on Health, Work and Wellbeing (manchester.ac.uk/hawnn), sits on the Health & Work advisory board for Public Health England and chairs the scientific advisory board for the ESRC Research Centre on Micro-Social Change Centre (MiSoC).

 

22nd September 2017

Call for Papers for special stream at the 36th ILPC, Buenos Aires, 21-23 March 2018

Call for Papers for special stream at the 36th ILPC, Buenos Aires, 21-23 March 2018

 

Breaking boundaries and opening new struggles:

Linking class and labour process to development in the Global South

 

Organisers:

Anita Hammer, Sociology of Work, De Montfort University, UK ahammer@dmu.ac.uk

Adam Fishwick, International Political Economy, DMU, UK adam.fishwick@dmu.ac.uk

Thomas Chambers, Social Anthropology, Oxford Brookes, UK tchambers@brookes.ac.uk

 

The special stream invites contributions that address the diversity of work and labour process in the Global South and its implications for class and development. Recent debates have sought to emphasise the return of class and its relevance to informal and precarious work in India (Agarwala 2013), to rethinking development in Global Production Networks (Campling et al. 2016), and to issues of collective action and resistance, production-social reproduction, and labour-state relations for understanding work and development across Latin America, South and East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East. Our core question is: how does the primacy of work and the labour process improve our understanding of development in the Global South?

 

The novelty, theoretically and methodologically, of the stream is its comparative and cross-disciplinary approach, breaking down boundaries – both geographical and disciplinary – to research on labour, work, and development across the Global South. While addressing general themes of class relations of inequality at work and in development, papers are sought that provide conceptually and empirically situated analyses of work and labour. The diversity of contexts reinforces the relevance of comparative analysis. The aim throughout the sessions will be to draw out the connections and differences across different sites and regions, at the same time advancing discussion on attempts to redefine ‘development’ around a more ‘work-oriented’ or ‘labour-centred’ approach.

 

Papers are sought on following themes, though they are not restricted to these – either conceptually or empirically – with a substantive focus on country(ies) and region(s) of Latin America, South and East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East. We strongly encourage papers from scholars based in these regions, as well as opening the stream to researchers working in other disciplines. Early career researchers and doctoral students are particularly encouraged to submit.

 

  • Intersections of class with other social relations of caste, gender and ethnicity and implications for labour process across national and/or regional contexts
  • Interlinkages between formal and informal and precarious work and labour in the Global South and implications for regulation, institutions and collective action
  • Work and class in the context of dispossession, new regions and value chain construction in different regions/countries
  • Blurred boundaries between production and social reproduction and implications for class and resistance
  • Forms of collective action, workplace resistance, and trade union organising
  • Alternative modes of organising work and the implications for construction of a ‘labour-centred’ development
  • Comparative research methodologies or papers that address the implications of comparative and/or interdisciplinary approaches in the Global South
  • South-South and North-South differences and points of comparison in work and labour across different sites and sectors
  • Implications for development of any of the above issues relating to work and labour

 

Successful contributors will also be invited to submit papers to prepare a special issue in a journal or an edited book based on their contributions to the special stream.

 

For informal enquiries pl contact Anita Hammer at ahammer@dmu.ac.uk

This special stream is linked to the Labour, Work, and Development Network launched in 2016 and which brings together established as well as early career and doctoral scholars from a variety of disciplines – sociology, anthropology, international political economy and geography – conducting research on labour, work, and development across the Global South. For more details see: https://labouranddevelopment.wordpress.com/

The deadline for submissions of abstracts is 31st October 2017 via the ILPC website (www.ilpc.org.uk). Please mention the special stream title.

22nd September 2017

HRM: Tensions, Limits and (Potential) Demise’ – Manchester Industrial Relations Society Meeting

Manchester Industrial Relations Society

Arthur Priest Memorial Lecture/Joint Meeting with Manchester CIPD

HRM: Tensions, Limits and (Potential) Demise

Speaker: Professor Tony Dundon

Professor of Human Resource Management, Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester

Co-author of Understanding Employment Relations (2011), Handbook of Research on Employee Voice (2014) and A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Employment Relations (2017)

http://www.mirs.org.uk/index.html

Thursday 19 October 6pm-7.30pm
Lecture Theatre LT33, Ground Floor
Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
All Saints, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BH
Map
:  http://www.mmu.ac.uk/travel/allsaints/

 

This presentation will review a longstanding tension in human resource management concerning the extent to which HRM can both support workers while at the same time representing (and defending) the interests of employers. Contemporary developments in hyper-marketization and ideological individualism will suggest that HR policy and practice have advanced an exclusive pro-market rather than inclusive pro-business agenda, to the neglect of broader organisational and societal concerns. As a result, the role of HRM - both an area of professional practice and an academic discipline - is at risk of impoverishment. Implications for the future of the subject area and the way HRM is taught in mainstream business schools will be considered.

20th September 2017

Climate Change and Work PhD Scholarship in University of Westminster

Climate Change and Work PhD Scholarship in University of Westminster

Three years, full time - £16,000 annual stipend plus fee waiver, see https://www.westminster.ac.uk/courses/research-degrees/research-areas/business/research-studentships

 

A full-time University of Westminster PhD Studentship is available to candidates with Home fee status in the Centre for the Study of the Production of the Built Environment (ProBE) starting in January 2018. This PhD studentship is part of ProBE’s programme of research on Climate Change and Work, conducted in partnership with the York University, Toronto, funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), led by Professor Carla Lipsig Mummé and entitled Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces (ACW), an international perspective (see see www.adaptingcanadianwork.ca). The programme aims to explore the role of work and global warming and the role of organised workers and trade unions as a force for adaptation. ProBE is responsible for the international dimension, with projects on green transition strategies and worker agency in Europe, the US, and at a global level, as well as in the built environment. The applicant is expected to have broad knowledge of the field and some experience of quantitative and qualitative research. The student will be asked to do 6 hours of work per week as a research assistant to support ProBE’s ACW research and enhance REF 2020 submission. There may also be opportunities for exchange visits to Canada.

 

The Studentship consists of a home/EU fee waiver and a stipend of £16,000 per annum over three years of PhD study.

 

Entry requirements

Eligible candidates will hold at least an upper second class honours degree and a Master’s degree. Candidates whose secondary level education has not been conducted in the medium of English should also demonstrate evidence of appropriate English language proficiency, normally defined as 6.5 in IELTS (with not less than 6.0 in any of the individual elements).

Read the University’s standard entry requirements.

Further enquiries

For an informal discussion, contact: Dr Kristina Vasileva, PhD Admissions Coordinator, T: +44 (0)20 7911 5000 ext 66771, E: k.vasileva@westminster.ac.uk; or Professor Linda Clarke, ProBE Director, Tel: 0044 (0)20350 66528, email: clarkel@westminster.ac.uk

Deadline: Monday 16 October 2017

17th September 2017

HRM: Tensions, Limits and (Potential) Demise Manchester Industrial Relations Society Arthur Priest Memorial Lecture/Joint Meeting with Manchester CIPD

Manchester Industrial Relations Society

 

The new Manchester Industrial Relations Society colour brochure with full details of the 2017-18 programme of meetings and speakers is now available on the Society’s newly redesigned website: www.mirs.org.uk

 

We have a very impressive line-up of topics and speakers, starting with Professor Tony Dundon (Alliance Manchester Business School and co-author of A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book About Employment Relations, 2017) speaking on HRM: Tensions, Limits and (Potential) Demise (joint meeting with the CIPD), Andy Beckett (Guardian journalist and author of When the Lights Went Out: Britain in the Seventies (2009) and Promised You a Miracle: Why 1980–82 Made Modern Britain (2015)’, speaking on Extraordinary Times in Politics and Society, and Alex Wood (Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford) speaking on The Gig Economy and Employment Relations. Other meetings on topics such as Brexit, discrimination law, and employment relations analytical perspectives, follow.

 

Meanwhile check out the amazing list of annual programme of meetings and speakers Manchester Industrial Relations Society have had over the last 53 years. The topics are a weather vane of the key industrial relations issues of the day, and the speakers include some of the most prestigious academic figures within the field as well as leading practitioners: http://www.mirs.org.uk/mirs-archives.php

 

Manchester Industrial Relations Society Arthur Priest Memorial Lecture/Joint Meeting with Manchester CIPD

HRM: Tensions, Limits and (Potential) Demise

Speaker: Professor Tony Dundon

Professor of Human Resource Management, Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester

Co-author of Understanding Employment Relations (2011), Handbook of Research on Employee Voice (2014) and A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book about Employment Relations (2017)

http://www.mirs.org.uk/index.html

Thursday 19 October 6pm-7.30pm
Lecture Theatre LT33, Ground Floor
Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
All Saints, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6BH
Map
:  http://www.mmu.ac.uk/travel/allsaints/

 

This presentation will review a longstanding tension in human resource management concerning the extent to which HRM can both support workers while at the same time representing (and defending) the interests of employers. Contemporary developments in hyper-marketization and ideological individualism will suggest that HR policy and practice have advanced an exclusive pro-market rather than inclusive pro-business agenda, to the neglect of broader organisational and societal concerns. As a result, the role of HRM - both an area of professional practice and an academic discipline - is at risk of impoverishment. Implications for the future of the subject area and the way HRM is taught in mainstream business schools will be considered.

For further details of the Manchester Industrial Relations Society please  contact:

 

Professor Ralph Darlington, Salford Business School, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT

Phone: 0161-295-5456; email: r.r.darlington@salford.ac.uk

Manchester Industrial Relations Society website: www.mirs.org.uk

Twitter: @ManchesterIRS

15th September 2017

BUIRA Conference 2017

Photos and a short report from the 2017 conference in Portsmouth 'The Changing Face of Industrial Relations: New Borders, New Frontiers' can now be viewed on the BUIRA website https://www.buira.org/conference/7

Stewart Johnstone

15th September 2017

ILERA World Congress: Deadline submission of abstracts extended until 30 September

Greetings,

This is the official announcement from the Secretariat of ILERA World Congress 2018.

We are so pleased to inform you that the deadline for Abstract/Session Proposal Submission has been extended to September 30, 2017. Please refer to the following important dates:

  1. Call for Papers
    - Abstract Submission Deadline: September 30, 2017
    - Notification of Abstract Acceptance: October 31, 2017
    - Full Paper Submission Deadline: January 31, 2018
    - Notification of Session Allocation: March 31, 2018

    2. Call for Organized Sessions
    - Session Proposal Submission Deadline: September 30, 2017
    - Notification of Session Proposal Acceptance: October 31, 2017
    - Abstract Submission Deadline: January 31, 2018
    - Notification of Session Allocation: March 31, 2018
  * Please note that the scholarship application deadline has also been extended to September 30, 2017.

In addition, please note that the scholarship application deadline has also been extended to September 30, 2017.

With your meaningful participation, the congress will be a valuable platform to seek the directivity for the new labor environment caused by the 4th industrial revolution under the theme “Employment for a Sustainable Society: What Is To Be Done?”.

  ◆ Track 1: Collective Voices and Social Dialogue for a Better Future
  ◆ Track 2: HRM Challenges and Responses for the Changing Workplace
  ◆ Track 3: Labor Market Dualization and Institutional Responses
  ◆ Track 4: Workforce Diversity, Labor Market Inequality and Social Integration
  ◆ Track 5: Work and Employment Relations in Emerging Market Economies
  ◆ Track 6: The Future of Work

For more detailed information regarding Abstract/Session Proposal Submission, please visit the website:
    - Call for Papers: http://www.ilera2018.org/abstract/submission.html
    - Call for Organized Sessions: http://www.ilera2018.org/abstract/organ_session.html

If you have any questions or comments on this congress, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Thank you.

11th September 2017

New book : The Emerging Industrial Relations of China'

Just published on industrial relations in contemporary China:

'The Emerging Industrial Relations of China', edited by William Brown
(Cambridge University) and Chang Kai (Renmin University of China),
Cambridge University Press, Hardback, £68.

Faced with rising worker aspirations and dissent, the past decade has
seen the Chinese government changing its relationship with both
employers and workers. Employers are developing their own organisations
and the once monolithic trade union has become more internally flexible.
In this book a new generation of Chinese scholars draw on fieldwork and
surveys to analyse developments in trade union organisation and employer
strategy, in collective consultation and employee participation, and in
the role of government and the treatment of strikes. It concludes with a
comparison of the Chinese experience with that in Vietnam and Russia by
Tim Pringle (SOAS).

Tom Kochan of MIT praises the book as '... destined to be the go-to
textbook and scholarly resource on this subject'.

11th September 2017

Job vacancy at Monash University

Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor - Human Resource Management/Employment Relations

Faculty / Portfolio:

Faculty Business and Economics 
Monash Business School 
Department of Management

Location: 

Clayton/Caulfield campus, Melbourne, Australia

Remuneration:

AUD$112,789 - $130,054 pa Level C /
AUD$135,812 - $149,616 pa Level D
(plus 17% employer superannuation)

With leading academics and world-class resources, combined with a ranking in the top 100 universities worldwide, we offer all you need to build a brighter future.

The Department of Management comprises the largest grouping of management researchers in Australia. Our main research strengths include corporate social responsibility, ethics, human resource management, leadership, operations and supply chain, organisational behaviour, organisational studies, public management and governance, work and employment.

Our research informs our teaching and makes a significant contribution to the body of management knowledge, with beneficial impacts on individuals, organisations and society.

We are entering a period of deep investment in our future capability and are now seeking a Senior Lecturer (Level C)/Assoc. Prof. (Level D) in the discipline areas of Human Resource Management/Employment Relations. We offer a vibrant research and academic community within a growing faculty that embraces diversity and encourages innovative learning practices.

If you have the relevant qualifications and research track record, a demonstrated ability to engage and educate, high-level interpersonal skills, and if you enjoy working as part of a team, we would love to hear from you. This role is a full-time position; however, flexible working arrangements may be negotiated. Your application must address the selection criteria. Please refer to "How to apply for Monash Jobs"

Enquiries

Prof. Véronique Ambrosini, Head of Department <v.ambrosini@monash.edu>

Prof. Véronique Ambrosini [and several other Monash University staff including me] will be available at the BAM conference, 5-7 Sep. at the University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
 

Position Description: Job No. 559118

Download File PD - Senior Lecturer
Download File 
PD - Associate Professor

See: http://careers.pageuppeople.com/513/cw/en/job/559118/senior-lecturerassociate-professor-human-resource-managementemployment-relations

 

Closing Date: Sunday 24 September 2017, 11.55pm AEST

 

8th September 2017

Job vacancy at Alliance Manchester Business School

SENIOR LECTURER IN EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS LAW

Closing Date : 24/09/2017.
Employment Type : Permanent.
School/Directorate : Alliance Manchester Business School.
Division : Alliance MBS - PMO Division.
Hours Per week : Full time.
Salary : £39,992 to £58,149 per annum according to experience.
Location : Oxford Road, Manchester.
Job Reference : HUM-10564.

Applications are invited from those with teaching and research interests in employment law. Teaching will comprise core employment law modules on the School’s undergraduate and postgraduate programmes (including the CIPD accredited MSc in HRM and Industrial Relations). You will be expected to make a significant research contribution in terms of grants, publications and impact, as well as to collaborate with colleagues across the School in the newly established Work and Equalities Institute.

As an equal opportunities employer, we welcome applications from all suitably qualified persons. As the School is committed to Athena SWAN principles, we would particularly welcome applications from women, who are currently under-represented at this grade. All appointments will be made on merit.

Further details here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BDT553/senior-lecturer-in-employment-law/

8th September 2017

job vacancy

Research Associate and PhD opportunities at the University of Sheffield
 
Sheffield University Management School has advertised a Research Associate vacancy in the area of national labour policy/labour administration. The closing date is 11th September.  Further information is available at: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BDL620/research-associate/
 
Sheffield University has also advertised 5 fully-funded PhD opportunities related to an ESRC large grant : Sustainable Care - Connecting People and Systems. Some of the PhD opportunities will be of interest to people with a background in employment relations/HRM/OB. The closing date is 31st August. Further information is available at:
 
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BDB356/sustainable-care-connecting-people-and-systems-5-exceptional-phd-study-opportunities-linked-to-a-multi-disciplinary-esrc-funded-programme-within-an-extensive-international-research-network/

25th August 2017

job vacancies

JOBS

Durham University Business School will be advertising a range of posts in management, including Employment Relations and HRM, in September.  Posts will be available at Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professorial levels.  Details will be available, once posted in September, on

https://www.dur.ac.uk/jobs/  

25th August 2017

Special Issue on Migration and Work

Journal of Industrial Relations special issue on Migration and Work

Dear colleagues

 

This is a reminder that the deadline for submission of articles to the Journal of Industrial Relations special issue on Migration and Work is 1 October 2017.

 

The Call for Papers is at the following link: http://journals.sagepub.com/pb-assets/cmscontent/JIR/JIR_migration_and_work_SI_CfP.pdf 

 

Regards,

Guest Editors:

Stephen Clibborn - stephen.clibborn@sydney.edu.au

Chris F Wright - chris.f.wright@sydney.edu.au

25th August 2017

BUIRA is on Twitter and on Facebook!

For the all  latest news, follow BUIRA on Twitter @BUIRAonline and on facebook https://www.facebook.com/BUIRAonline/

 

19th September 2016


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